• JONATHAN CHERRY: When did you last see the sunrise?

SNORRI STURLUSON: I don’t even remember that. Must have been a while ago. I should make a point of doing that soon, it’s just so damn cold in New York now.

JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?

SS: Daniel Arnold is my favourite photographer at the moment. His work is so in the moment. Also, James Greco is an amazing painter/sculpturist that I like a lot. His work is strong, powerful, bold. 

JC: Whats your current project all about?

SS: My book ‘Laundromat' is just coming out and it's a portrait of New York City as I experience it. It's a micro view if you will. I focused on Laundromats, and only on the fronts of them. Through those pictures I get an experience of New York and its multilayered communities. That's my unique point of view in some way. But it's really a portrait of the city I live in. 

JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?

SS: I live in New York City. To be exact, Park Slope, Brooklyn. New York has shaped me in so many ways since I moved here in 2001 from Iceland. 9/11 was a huge part of that, re-affirmed so many things I believe to be true about the human condition. Nothing is gained with violence, nothing is won in a war, there are only losers. New York is a place where tolerance, understanding and compassion are to be found in such abundance if one cares to look beyond the greedy front of Wall Street and the glossy image of the Fashion Industry. Around 9/11 people rallied together in a way that was incredibly moving and touching. The truth of humanity comes out under such circumstances. 

JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?

SS: Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. You can never shoot too much. But don’t forget to edit. That’s where the learning actually happens.

JC: Any big plans for 2013?

SS: Oh yes, I have an exhibition in Los Angeles and in New York. They’re both on the Laundromat theme. I always have a lot of photography projects in the back of my mind that I’m constantly shooting for but besides that I’m now working on a feature film that I’m going to direct. It’s called … Laundromat.

JC: Favourite tree?

SS: Not Christmas Tree but the other one, don’t know what it’s called.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: When did you last see the sunrise?

SNORRI STURLUSON: I don’t even remember that. Must have been a while ago. I should make a point of doing that soon, it’s just so damn cold in New York now.

JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?

SS: Daniel Arnold is my favourite photographer at the moment. His work is so in the moment. Also, James Greco is an amazing painter/sculpturist that I like a lot. His work is strong, powerful, bold. 

JC: Whats your current project all about?

SS: My book ‘Laundromat' is just coming out and it's a portrait of New York City as I experience it. It's a micro view if you will. I focused on Laundromats, and only on the fronts of them. Through those pictures I get an experience of New York and its multilayered communities. That's my unique point of view in some way. But it's really a portrait of the city I live in. 

JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?

SS: I live in New York City. To be exact, Park Slope, Brooklyn. New York has shaped me in so many ways since I moved here in 2001 from Iceland. 9/11 was a huge part of that, re-affirmed so many things I believe to be true about the human condition. Nothing is gained with violence, nothing is won in a war, there are only losers. New York is a place where tolerance, understanding and compassion are to be found in such abundance if one cares to look beyond the greedy front of Wall Street and the glossy image of the Fashion Industry. Around 9/11 people rallied together in a way that was incredibly moving and touching. The truth of humanity comes out under such circumstances. 

JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?

SS: Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. You can never shoot too much. But don’t forget to edit. That’s where the learning actually happens.

JC: Any big plans for 2013?

SS: Oh yes, I have an exhibition in Los Angeles and in New York. They’re both on the Laundromat theme. I always have a lot of photography projects in the back of my mind that I’m constantly shooting for but besides that I’m now working on a feature film that I’m going to direct. It’s called … Laundromat.

JC: Favourite tree?

SS: Not Christmas Tree but the other one, don’t know what it’s called.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: When did you last see the sunrise?

SNORRI STURLUSON: I don’t even remember that. Must have been a while ago. I should make a point of doing that soon, it’s just so damn cold in New York now.

JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?

SS: Daniel Arnold is my favourite photographer at the moment. His work is so in the moment. Also, James Greco is an amazing painter/sculpturist that I like a lot. His work is strong, powerful, bold. 

JC: Whats your current project all about?

SS: My book ‘Laundromat' is just coming out and it's a portrait of New York City as I experience it. It's a micro view if you will. I focused on Laundromats, and only on the fronts of them. Through those pictures I get an experience of New York and its multilayered communities. That's my unique point of view in some way. But it's really a portrait of the city I live in. 

JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?

SS: I live in New York City. To be exact, Park Slope, Brooklyn. New York has shaped me in so many ways since I moved here in 2001 from Iceland. 9/11 was a huge part of that, re-affirmed so many things I believe to be true about the human condition. Nothing is gained with violence, nothing is won in a war, there are only losers. New York is a place where tolerance, understanding and compassion are to be found in such abundance if one cares to look beyond the greedy front of Wall Street and the glossy image of the Fashion Industry. Around 9/11 people rallied together in a way that was incredibly moving and touching. The truth of humanity comes out under such circumstances. 

JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?

SS: Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. You can never shoot too much. But don’t forget to edit. That’s where the learning actually happens.

JC: Any big plans for 2013?

SS: Oh yes, I have an exhibition in Los Angeles and in New York. They’re both on the Laundromat theme. I always have a lot of photography projects in the back of my mind that I’m constantly shooting for but besides that I’m now working on a feature film that I’m going to direct. It’s called … Laundromat.

JC: Favourite tree?

SS: Not Christmas Tree but the other one, don’t know what it’s called.

JONATHAN CHERRY: When did you last see the sunrise?

SNORRI STURLUSON: I don’t even remember that. Must have been a while ago. I should make a point of doing that soon, it’s just so damn cold in New York now.

JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?

SS: Daniel Arnold is my favourite photographer at the moment. His work is so in the moment. Also, James Greco is an amazing painter/sculpturist that I like a lot. His work is strong, powerful, bold. 

JC: Whats your current project all about?

SS: My book ‘Laundromat' is just coming out and it's a portrait of New York City as I experience it. It's a micro view if you will. I focused on Laundromats, and only on the fronts of them. Through those pictures I get an experience of New York and its multilayered communities. That's my unique point of view in some way. But it's really a portrait of the city I live in. 

JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?

SS: I live in New York City. To be exact, Park Slope, Brooklyn. New York has shaped me in so many ways since I moved here in 2001 from Iceland. 9/11 was a huge part of that, re-affirmed so many things I believe to be true about the human condition. Nothing is gained with violence, nothing is won in a war, there are only losers. New York is a place where tolerance, understanding and compassion are to be found in such abundance if one cares to look beyond the greedy front of Wall Street and the glossy image of the Fashion Industry. Around 9/11 people rallied together in a way that was incredibly moving and touching. The truth of humanity comes out under such circumstances. 

JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?

SS: Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. You can never shoot too much. But don’t forget to edit. That’s where the learning actually happens.

JC: Any big plans for 2013?

SS: Oh yes, I have an exhibition in Los Angeles and in New York. They’re both on the Laundromat theme. I always have a lot of photography projects in the back of my mind that I’m constantly shooting for but besides that I’m now working on a feature film that I’m going to direct. It’s called … Laundromat.

JC: Favourite tree?

SS: Not Christmas Tree but the other one, don’t know what it’s called.