• JONATHAN CHERRY: What got you started with photography?
JAMES CHOROROS: I studied fine art and graphic design in college, but I would have to say I discovered my passion for photography in graduate school while earning my Architecture degree. As a student of Architecture, you regularly need to describe your work through drawings, imagery, and models. I soon came to realize that my favorite aspect of this process was creating and structuring the imagery so that it best told the story of the concepts and characteristics that evolved to ultimately become the design. Eventually, in my last year of school I saved some money and bought a DSLR. I had shot film before in college, but on a tight schedule and budget I came to find that the ease of shooting digital in order to make images had me completely hooked. 
JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?
JC: Tumblr has actually helped me create a lot of connections and gain exposure to a wider range of work in just a short few months, both emerging and more established artists. Right now I like Elizabeth Wienberg (her water series is especially inspiring), Adam Goldberg (beautiful polaroids & film) and Derek Wood. I’m also inspired by photographers like Max Wanger and Jonas Peterson, as they’ve taken a tired and generally uninspiring category of photography and given it a new artistic life. This list changes almost every week. 
JC: Whats your current project all about?
JC: I have some portrait projects in the works as well as a more abstract project I haven’t fully defined that will focus on patterning. However I am endlessly interested in documenting our use and interaction with a broad range of environments including natural, built, urban/suburban, underdeveloped, and so on. So that is a continuous source of inspiration for me between projects.  
JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?
JC: I currently live in Brooklyn, NY and I have to say that living there has completely reinvented my outlook and attitude regarding my own creative output. I’m more inspired by the people than the surroundings so it’s not only the architecture, art, and music scenes but the way of life that inspires me. There is just a certain creativity and openness to new ideas among people in Brooklyn that is hard to find elsewhere. Aside from a lot of bicycles, It’s flooded with original, energetic, and talented people working to define their own paths and I think that is awesome. 
JC: Any big plans for 2012?
JC: Yes, but they’re very rough as of right now. You’ll have to come back to me for that one. 
JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?
JC: Take risks, be different, and always be bold. 
JC: Favourite tree?
JC: Redwood trees rock.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What got you started with photography?
JAMES CHOROROS: I studied fine art and graphic design in college, but I would have to say I discovered my passion for photography in graduate school while earning my Architecture degree. As a student of Architecture, you regularly need to describe your work through drawings, imagery, and models. I soon came to realize that my favorite aspect of this process was creating and structuring the imagery so that it best told the story of the concepts and characteristics that evolved to ultimately become the design. Eventually, in my last year of school I saved some money and bought a DSLR. I had shot film before in college, but on a tight schedule and budget I came to find that the ease of shooting digital in order to make images had me completely hooked. 
JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?
JC: Tumblr has actually helped me create a lot of connections and gain exposure to a wider range of work in just a short few months, both emerging and more established artists. Right now I like Elizabeth Wienberg (her water series is especially inspiring), Adam Goldberg (beautiful polaroids & film) and Derek Wood. I’m also inspired by photographers like Max Wanger and Jonas Peterson, as they’ve taken a tired and generally uninspiring category of photography and given it a new artistic life. This list changes almost every week. 
JC: Whats your current project all about?
JC: I have some portrait projects in the works as well as a more abstract project I haven’t fully defined that will focus on patterning. However I am endlessly interested in documenting our use and interaction with a broad range of environments including natural, built, urban/suburban, underdeveloped, and so on. So that is a continuous source of inspiration for me between projects.  
JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?
JC: I currently live in Brooklyn, NY and I have to say that living there has completely reinvented my outlook and attitude regarding my own creative output. I’m more inspired by the people than the surroundings so it’s not only the architecture, art, and music scenes but the way of life that inspires me. There is just a certain creativity and openness to new ideas among people in Brooklyn that is hard to find elsewhere. Aside from a lot of bicycles, It’s flooded with original, energetic, and talented people working to define their own paths and I think that is awesome. 
JC: Any big plans for 2012?
JC: Yes, but they’re very rough as of right now. You’ll have to come back to me for that one. 
JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?
JC: Take risks, be different, and always be bold. 
JC: Favourite tree?
JC: Redwood trees rock.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What got you started with photography?
JAMES CHOROROS: I studied fine art and graphic design in college, but I would have to say I discovered my passion for photography in graduate school while earning my Architecture degree. As a student of Architecture, you regularly need to describe your work through drawings, imagery, and models. I soon came to realize that my favorite aspect of this process was creating and structuring the imagery so that it best told the story of the concepts and characteristics that evolved to ultimately become the design. Eventually, in my last year of school I saved some money and bought a DSLR. I had shot film before in college, but on a tight schedule and budget I came to find that the ease of shooting digital in order to make images had me completely hooked. 
JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?
JC: Tumblr has actually helped me create a lot of connections and gain exposure to a wider range of work in just a short few months, both emerging and more established artists. Right now I like Elizabeth Wienberg (her water series is especially inspiring), Adam Goldberg (beautiful polaroids & film) and Derek Wood. I’m also inspired by photographers like Max Wanger and Jonas Peterson, as they’ve taken a tired and generally uninspiring category of photography and given it a new artistic life. This list changes almost every week. 
JC: Whats your current project all about?
JC: I have some portrait projects in the works as well as a more abstract project I haven’t fully defined that will focus on patterning. However I am endlessly interested in documenting our use and interaction with a broad range of environments including natural, built, urban/suburban, underdeveloped, and so on. So that is a continuous source of inspiration for me between projects.  
JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?
JC: I currently live in Brooklyn, NY and I have to say that living there has completely reinvented my outlook and attitude regarding my own creative output. I’m more inspired by the people than the surroundings so it’s not only the architecture, art, and music scenes but the way of life that inspires me. There is just a certain creativity and openness to new ideas among people in Brooklyn that is hard to find elsewhere. Aside from a lot of bicycles, It’s flooded with original, energetic, and talented people working to define their own paths and I think that is awesome. 
JC: Any big plans for 2012?
JC: Yes, but they’re very rough as of right now. You’ll have to come back to me for that one. 
JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?
JC: Take risks, be different, and always be bold. 
JC: Favourite tree?
JC: Redwood trees rock.

JONATHAN CHERRY: What got you started with photography?

JAMES CHOROROS: I studied fine art and graphic design in college, but I would have to say I discovered my passion for photography in graduate school while earning my Architecture degree. As a student of Architecture, you regularly need to describe your work through drawings, imagery, and models. I soon came to realize that my favorite aspect of this process was creating and structuring the imagery so that it best told the story of the concepts and characteristics that evolved to ultimately become the design. Eventually, in my last year of school I saved some money and bought a DSLR. I had shot film before in college, but on a tight schedule and budget I came to find that the ease of shooting digital in order to make images had me completely hooked. 

JC: Any emerging artists inspiring you at the moment?

JC: Tumblr has actually helped me create a lot of connections and gain exposure to a wider range of work in just a short few months, both emerging and more established artists. Right now I like Elizabeth Wienberg (her water series is especially inspiring), Adam Goldberg (beautiful polaroids & film) and Derek Wood. I’m also inspired by photographers like Max Wanger and Jonas Peterson, as they’ve taken a tired and generally uninspiring category of photography and given it a new artistic life. This list changes almost every week. 

JC: Whats your current project all about?

JC: I have some portrait projects in the works as well as a more abstract project I haven’t fully defined that will focus on patterning. However I am endlessly interested in documenting our use and interaction with a broad range of environments including natural, built, urban/suburban, underdeveloped, and so on. So that is a continuous source of inspiration for me between projects.  

JC: Where are you currently living and how is it shaping you?

JC: I currently live in Brooklyn, NY and I have to say that living there has completely reinvented my outlook and attitude regarding my own creative output. I’m more inspired by the people than the surroundings so it’s not only the architecture, art, and music scenes but the way of life that inspires me. There is just a certain creativity and openness to new ideas among people in Brooklyn that is hard to find elsewhere. Aside from a lot of bicycles, It’s flooded with original, energetic, and talented people working to define their own paths and I think that is awesome. 

JC: Any big plans for 2012?

JC: Yes, but they’re very rough as of right now. You’ll have to come back to me for that one. 

JC: One piece of advice to recent photography graduates?

JC: Take risks, be different, and always be bold. 

JC: Favourite tree?

JC: Redwood trees rock.