• JONATHAN CHERRY: What gets you up in the morning?
FRANCK BOHBOT: I wish it would be an italian coffee but the french one is ok! Seriously when I wake up I think about a new idea, and I’m happy to begin a new day in my life.
JC: Are there any artists inspiring you at the moment?
FB: The works of Stephen Shore, Willy Ronis, Candida Höfer and Gabriele Basilico influence me greatly. I’m drawn to the way they photograph because it looks so much like painting.
Also the work of director Stanley Kubrick inspires me a lot. 
JC: What is Theater all about?
FB: Through my series Theater I want to strip back the places that I photograph - there are no actors or members of the public within my photographs. I wanted this impression of ‘the invisible’, to tell that even with the absence of people, the places are still there because of the history within a place. It’s a homage really.
JC: What have you got planned for the rest of 2011?
FB: I’m still doing a lot of architectural shoots and a few portraits at the moment. Towards the end of 2011 I will be focussing on documentary photography using my large format camera starting off in Germany then Cuba then USA. I must keep this project a little hush hush right now though.
JC: What draws you to working on interior photographs?
FB: I really don’t know! I started photography as a stills photographer on movie sets and quickly fell in love with the art of lighting and controlling the situation. 
Another reason for being drawn to interiors is that I want to tell stories about places and people. Some photographers do it very well with a portrait; others with a street photograph but as for me, its during these moments of stillness with an interior that I find myself feeling most able to get the most out of the situation.
JC: Any advice to recent photography graduates?
FB: Try to concentrate more on viewing images in your brain before you create them. Take a camera and shoot every day. Don’t stop. Never give up. It’s like a musical instrument.
JC: Favourite tree?
FB: The monumental Séquoia.

JONATHAN CHERRY: What gets you up in the morning?

FRANCK BOHBOT: I wish it would be an italian coffee but the french one is ok! Seriously when I wake up I think about a new idea, and I’m happy to begin a new day in my life.

JC: Are there any artists inspiring you at the moment?

FB: The works of Stephen Shore, Willy RonisCandida Höfer and Gabriele Basilico influence me greatly. I’m drawn to the way they photograph because it looks so much like painting.

Also the work of director Stanley Kubrick inspires me a lot. 

JC: What is Theater all about?

FB: Through my series Theater I want to strip back the places that I photograph - there are no actors or members of the public within my photographs. I wanted this impression of ‘the invisible’, to tell that even with the absence of people, the places are still there because of the history within a place. It’s a homage really.

JC: What have you got planned for the rest of 2011?

FB: I’m still doing a lot of architectural shoots and a few portraits at the moment. Towards the end of 2011 I will be focussing on documentary photography using my large format camera starting off in Germany then Cuba then USA. I must keep this project a little hush hush right now though.

JC: What draws you to working on interior photographs?

FB: I really don’t know! I started photography as a stills photographer on movie sets and quickly fell in love with the art of lighting and controlling the situation. 

Another reason for being drawn to interiors is that I want to tell stories about places and people. Some photographers do it very well with a portrait; others with a street photograph but as for me, its during these moments of stillness with an interior that I find myself feeling most able to get the most out of the situation.

JC: Any advice to recent photography graduates?

FB: Try to concentrate more on viewing images in your brain before you create them. Take a camera and shoot every day. Don’t stop. Never give up. It’s like a musical instrument.

JC: Favourite tree?

FB: The monumental Séquoia.