• I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc

I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SYBILLA PATRIZIA: An architect. I have always loved skyscrapers and huge buildings with lots of glass and interesting shapes.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SP: I am always inspired by people who are passionate about what they do and committed to dedicating their life to those things. I admire National Geographic photographers, the Tibetan refugee community, people who can compose great music and Jiro (the one who dreams of Sushi).

JC: What are you up to right now?

SP: I am mainly working on fashion shoots at the moment but I am also planning to expand my documentary work. For now building up my portfolio is my biggest goal, so I am trying to immerse myself as much as possible into photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SP: Not until I joined my university last September. I think photography is a lot about teaching oneself and everyone needs to discover their individual approach to solving a creative problem. As a photographer you often find yourself working alone but at the same time this gives you an incredible freedom of expression which you don’t always have when working in groups.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SP: I moved to London just a couple of months ago and I am becoming more and more aware of how many creative opportunities there are in the city. I was pretty overwhelmed at first seeing how much competition there is but I am also realizing that many people here just talk the talk and don’t walk the walk.

London, as a city, I think is highly overrated though. I could easily name a handful of cities with better quality of life but the opportunities for a young photographer like me are probably almost unequaled in the world. If anything, London has contributed to making me realize how much there is still today in the so-called ‘modern world.’

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SP: Hell, what can I say I still haven’t graduated myself, you know! But pretending that I am an old wise woman I would say, don’t let anyone tell you what to do, ever!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SP: I don’t have a plan B because I believe that as long as you keep fighting for your dream there is always a way to achieve it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SP: It is, but I think it is even more important to open yourself up to the global community. Lots of artists make the mistake of thinking that they get inspired and can create amazing work by just being surrounded by other artists, but this often makes people even more narrow-minded. I think creative individuals (and everyone else really) should focus more on what’s happening outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves to become a better and more interesting person everyday. As a true artist you have to be aware of political, economical and cultural changes in all of the world and elevate yourself and your work to a level of critical reasoning.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERICH DELEEUW: I wanted to be a Garbage Man until I found out you had to work more than one day a week. Following this it was my dream to open Mr. Bones, A gourmet restaurant for dogs and their owners.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ED: I heard so many great things about unpaid internships that I decided to help out on FUNCTION 15. This is a yearly publication produced by Ryerson Image Arts Students. All joking aside this has turned out to be a phenomenal experience. I got the opportunity to shoot stills for the interviews and take portraits. It was extremely inspiring to hear Max Dean and Gord Peteran speak to each other about the artist’s hand and their opinions of authorship.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ED: I just finished a showing a body of work produced around the Baltic Sea this past summer at the Westland Gallery. I released a photo book titled Visions along with a super–8 movie made over the course of the trip. In addition to this I’m building a wet plate camera with my good friend and fellow classmate Andrew. He was actually able to get in touch with Mike Robinson, the president of the daguerreotype society, a former professor and an all around bad-ass. He is currently in charge of the Archive of Modern Conflict. We got to meet up with him and look at some 18th century camera designs and he gave us some really great advice on how to build the camera backs.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ED: I had a great teacher in high school who really went out of her way to teach us the basics of photography, I recall her setting up a really make shift darkroom in the welding booth just so we could experience using a darkroom. I also worked in a lab in high school and had a really shitty boss who ran the store into the ground he kinda taught what not to do and how not to treat people.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ED: I’m currently based in Toronto, ON. Being from somewhat of a smaller city it’s been an interesting experience. I’ve noticed that you really have to put yourself out there, but if you do there are tons of great opportunities. When I’m bored I like to get lost and find my way back home to see what I come across.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ED: I haven’t graduated yet so I’m not too sure, I’d just say it’s good to be humble and to admit when you don’t know something.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ED: I still think Mr. Bones is a good idea!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ED: Yes I think it’s very important to at least for myself. I find it very refreshing to be around people who are equally passionate about the medium. That being said I appreciate being alone for the most part when I’m shooting.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography.  I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography. I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc