• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CHRIS MOODY: I wanted to be a lot of things: first it was to save the rainforest, then to join the army, and around 10 I thought about oceanography or a photojournalist/anthropologist. also wanted to be a pro basketball player and knew i would never go pro in skating… I agree with all except for joining the army.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CM: The past present and future, nothing too specific.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CM: Creating new projects, collecting zines, posting stickers, finding gigs, and working at a smoothie & juice shop. At the moment EATING BACON.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CM: My old high school teacher Melissa was definitely a big help: getting me publications, equipment, and allowing me to spend all day in the darkroom. She’s rad.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CM: After living in no name places to the rest of the world I recently moved to New York City, the fast pace is pretty sweet but everyone’s sooo busy… not sure how it’s shaping me… We’ll see.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CM: I hope you received a scholarship cause that shit is overrated.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CM: Lots of options really, but the main one being I would move to West Virginia and take over my great-grandparents house which has been vacant for some time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CM: Yes and no, I had never really been apart of one, kind of just doing my own thing, but that’s a main force of bringing myself to the city.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGIA AMY: To begin with, I planned on being a princess, shortly followed by a Spice Girl. Later on in my childhood I wanted to be a writer, reading and writing provided a form of magical escapism, which I was always searching for. I never imagined I would be on the path I am today; I find that the reasons behind my dreams growing up are still the same now. I wanted to be able to escape from the mundane every day and also express myself.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GA: In my latest photographic project I looked at how women were portrayed throughout art history to be able to produce my own portrait work on the female. I found inspiration in painters such as Vermeer. Also the words of Keaton Henson, beautiful sounds and beautiful faces are constantly inspiring me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GA: I have recently finished studying my photography degree at Cleveland College of Art and Design. My work was displayed on the campus as part of the degree show; this was followed by an exhibition at London’s Old Truman’s Brewery for the Free Range event from 19-23 of June. In August I relocated to London to study an MA in Photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art the following month. I feel like I have begun a new chapter and time is moving very fast.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GA: My two tutors Jamie Macdonald and Antony Chambers have been exceptional mentors and I feel that I owe them a lot. I have never before met two lecturers that put the amount of inspiring passion in their teaching and offer such great help and support. I feel incredibly grateful to have had them as mentors; they helped shape who I am as an artist today. My partner Thomas, also a photographer and videographer, has been a constant mentor. I have been very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GA: I am based in the North East of England in a seaside town named Hartlepool. Its banality has helped shape my way of seeing. It encouraged me to look close and search for glimmers of beauty in the grey.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GA: My advice would be to always do what you love, strive for the best and have confidence in yourself. Don’t be afraid of not knowing exactly what you’re doing, you’re not alone and time has a way of helping you figure things out. I would also say to prepare to work hard and push yourself.  I think it’s also important to look back on all that you have achieved at university and allow yourself to appreciate this.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GA: I don’t have a plan B… maybe I should, but I would rather try optimism for a change.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GA: I think it is important to surround yourself with likeminded people who share similar artistic passions.  You can bounce off each other, inspire and be inspired. I think starting a blog was one of the best things I have done.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGIA AMY: To begin with, I planned on being a princess, shortly followed by a Spice Girl. Later on in my childhood I wanted to be a writer, reading and writing provided a form of magical escapism, which I was always searching for. I never imagined I would be on the path I am today; I find that the reasons behind my dreams growing up are still the same now. I wanted to be able to escape from the mundane every day and also express myself.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GA: In my latest photographic project I looked at how women were portrayed throughout art history to be able to produce my own portrait work on the female. I found inspiration in painters such as Vermeer. Also the words of Keaton Henson, beautiful sounds and beautiful faces are constantly inspiring me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GA: I have recently finished studying my photography degree at Cleveland College of Art and Design. My work was displayed on the campus as part of the degree show; this was followed by an exhibition at London’s Old Truman’s Brewery for the Free Range event from 19-23 of June. In August I relocated to London to study an MA in Photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art the following month. I feel like I have begun a new chapter and time is moving very fast.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GA: My two tutors Jamie Macdonald and Antony Chambers have been exceptional mentors and I feel that I owe them a lot. I have never before met two lecturers that put the amount of inspiring passion in their teaching and offer such great help and support. I feel incredibly grateful to have had them as mentors; they helped shape who I am as an artist today. My partner Thomas, also a photographer and videographer, has been a constant mentor. I have been very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GA: I am based in the North East of England in a seaside town named Hartlepool. Its banality has helped shape my way of seeing. It encouraged me to look close and search for glimmers of beauty in the grey.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GA: My advice would be to always do what you love, strive for the best and have confidence in yourself. Don’t be afraid of not knowing exactly what you’re doing, you’re not alone and time has a way of helping you figure things out. I would also say to prepare to work hard and push yourself.  I think it’s also important to look back on all that you have achieved at university and allow yourself to appreciate this.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GA: I don’t have a plan B… maybe I should, but I would rather try optimism for a change.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GA: I think it is important to surround yourself with likeminded people who share similar artistic passions.  You can bounce off each other, inspire and be inspired. I think starting a blog was one of the best things I have done.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGIA AMY: To begin with, I planned on being a princess, shortly followed by a Spice Girl. Later on in my childhood I wanted to be a writer, reading and writing provided a form of magical escapism, which I was always searching for. I never imagined I would be on the path I am today; I find that the reasons behind my dreams growing up are still the same now. I wanted to be able to escape from the mundane every day and also express myself.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GA: In my latest photographic project I looked at how women were portrayed throughout art history to be able to produce my own portrait work on the female. I found inspiration in painters such as Vermeer. Also the words of Keaton Henson, beautiful sounds and beautiful faces are constantly inspiring me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GA: I have recently finished studying my photography degree at Cleveland College of Art and Design. My work was displayed on the campus as part of the degree show; this was followed by an exhibition at London’s Old Truman’s Brewery for the Free Range event from 19-23 of June. In August I relocated to London to study an MA in Photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art the following month. I feel like I have begun a new chapter and time is moving very fast.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GA: My two tutors Jamie Macdonald and Antony Chambers have been exceptional mentors and I feel that I owe them a lot. I have never before met two lecturers that put the amount of inspiring passion in their teaching and offer such great help and support. I feel incredibly grateful to have had them as mentors; they helped shape who I am as an artist today. My partner Thomas, also a photographer and videographer, has been a constant mentor. I have been very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GA: I am based in the North East of England in a seaside town named Hartlepool. Its banality has helped shape my way of seeing. It encouraged me to look close and search for glimmers of beauty in the grey.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GA: My advice would be to always do what you love, strive for the best and have confidence in yourself. Don’t be afraid of not knowing exactly what you’re doing, you’re not alone and time has a way of helping you figure things out. I would also say to prepare to work hard and push yourself.  I think it’s also important to look back on all that you have achieved at university and allow yourself to appreciate this.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GA: I don’t have a plan B… maybe I should, but I would rather try optimism for a change.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GA: I think it is important to surround yourself with likeminded people who share similar artistic passions.  You can bounce off each other, inspire and be inspired. I think starting a blog was one of the best things I have done.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGIA AMY: To begin with, I planned on being a princess, shortly followed by a Spice Girl. Later on in my childhood I wanted to be a writer, reading and writing provided a form of magical escapism, which I was always searching for. I never imagined I would be on the path I am today; I find that the reasons behind my dreams growing up are still the same now. I wanted to be able to escape from the mundane every day and also express myself.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GA: In my latest photographic project I looked at how women were portrayed throughout art history to be able to produce my own portrait work on the female. I found inspiration in painters such as Vermeer. Also the words of Keaton Henson, beautiful sounds and beautiful faces are constantly inspiring me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GA: I have recently finished studying my photography degree at Cleveland College of Art and Design. My work was displayed on the campus as part of the degree show; this was followed by an exhibition at London’s Old Truman’s Brewery for the Free Range event from 19-23 of June. In August I relocated to London to study an MA in Photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art the following month. I feel like I have begun a new chapter and time is moving very fast.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GA: My two tutors Jamie Macdonald and Antony Chambers have been exceptional mentors and I feel that I owe them a lot. I have never before met two lecturers that put the amount of inspiring passion in their teaching and offer such great help and support. I feel incredibly grateful to have had them as mentors; they helped shape who I am as an artist today. My partner Thomas, also a photographer and videographer, has been a constant mentor. I have been very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GA: I am based in the North East of England in a seaside town named Hartlepool. Its banality has helped shape my way of seeing. It encouraged me to look close and search for glimmers of beauty in the grey.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GA: My advice would be to always do what you love, strive for the best and have confidence in yourself. Don’t be afraid of not knowing exactly what you’re doing, you’re not alone and time has a way of helping you figure things out. I would also say to prepare to work hard and push yourself.  I think it’s also important to look back on all that you have achieved at university and allow yourself to appreciate this.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GA: I don’t have a plan B… maybe I should, but I would rather try optimism for a change.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GA: I think it is important to surround yourself with likeminded people who share similar artistic passions.  You can bounce off each other, inspire and be inspired. I think starting a blog was one of the best things I have done.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGIA AMY: To begin with, I planned on being a princess, shortly followed by a Spice Girl. Later on in my childhood I wanted to be a writer, reading and writing provided a form of magical escapism, which I was always searching for. I never imagined I would be on the path I am today; I find that the reasons behind my dreams growing up are still the same now. I wanted to be able to escape from the mundane every day and also express myself.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GA: In my latest photographic project I looked at how women were portrayed throughout art history to be able to produce my own portrait work on the female. I found inspiration in painters such as Vermeer. Also the words of Keaton Henson, beautiful sounds and beautiful faces are constantly inspiring me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GA: I have recently finished studying my photography degree at Cleveland College of Art and Design. My work was displayed on the campus as part of the degree show; this was followed by an exhibition at London’s Old Truman’s Brewery for the Free Range event from 19-23 of June. In August I relocated to London to study an MA in Photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art the following month. I feel like I have begun a new chapter and time is moving very fast.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GA: My two tutors Jamie Macdonald and Antony Chambers have been exceptional mentors and I feel that I owe them a lot. I have never before met two lecturers that put the amount of inspiring passion in their teaching and offer such great help and support. I feel incredibly grateful to have had them as mentors; they helped shape who I am as an artist today. My partner Thomas, also a photographer and videographer, has been a constant mentor. I have been very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GA: I am based in the North East of England in a seaside town named Hartlepool. Its banality has helped shape my way of seeing. It encouraged me to look close and search for glimmers of beauty in the grey.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GA: My advice would be to always do what you love, strive for the best and have confidence in yourself. Don’t be afraid of not knowing exactly what you’re doing, you’re not alone and time has a way of helping you figure things out. I would also say to prepare to work hard and push yourself. I think it’s also important to look back on all that you have achieved at university and allow yourself to appreciate this.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GA: I don’t have a plan B… maybe I should, but I would rather try optimism for a change.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GA: I think it is important to surround yourself with likeminded people who share similar artistic passions. You can bounce off each other, inspire and be inspired. I think starting a blog was one of the best things I have done.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc