• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the  work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it.  There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it. There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SHANE TERRY: I think my first desire was to race motorcycles. My dad has always been a bike enthusiast, so I can thank him for that. He’d regularly take me to races when I was younger and show me pictures he’d taken at different tracks. I loved it.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ST: I usually find inspiration whenever I visit my hometown. The last time I was back I found some photo albums in a box that my dad had made from trips to China and Japan in the late ‘70s that I never knew about. That was exciting. I’ve also been re-reading Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find. There’s this uneasy, cryptic undercurrent in her writing that just sticks with you. And I recently found a copy of Ken Price’s Works on Paper, which is really great. His sense of composition and use of colour is incredible.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ST: Lately, most of my free time has been spent putting together my first book, which should be finished by spring. It’s been a fun project, although I haven’t shot anything new in months. I’m also planning to travel a bit this summer to shoot. Other than that, I’m in school full-time at the University of Toronto, so that keeps me occupied.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ST: Not really, no. I’ve never formally studied photography, though I was with a girl for a while who was very encouraging. There was a fairly long period where she was the only person who even saw what I was doing. That meant a lot. A few close friends have also been supportive and offered feedback, but that’s about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ST: I currently live in downtown Toronto, Canada, although I don’t think the city is shaping me in any significant way. I grew up in a small town, and despite occasionally traveling back and forth, my approach to photography hasn’t changed. I think I could live anywhere and it would be the same.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ST: I’d advise anybody pursuing photography to just trust their gut and shoot what interests them. That, and try not to overthink things.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

ST: I’d say that taking pictures is essentially my plan B. It began as just a hobby that was unrelated to school or work, and even when it takes up most of my day, it still feels like a pastime. In terms of potential career paths, I’m not really sure. I think I could see myself teaching.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ST: I think it’s important, to a degree. Being around people who challenge you and allow you to challenge them is definitely a good thing. I think that’s probably the best reason to go to art school or whatever—to be around like-minded people. It’s tough for me to say, since I don’t know many photographers or artists. But, I have a lot of musician friends. Maybe I should get out more.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ALYSON BOWEN: Growing up I had wanted to be a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It was a wild dream inspired by my hospital visits and the surgeon who corrected my spine. He was constantly putting his effort into innovative ways to improve the lives of others. I found it fascinating and admirable. It wasn’t until my high school years that I decided I wanted to pursue art in some form or another. It was also in high school that I realized I wanted to teach.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AB: I have been finding a great deal of inspiration through collective efforts lately. I am lucky to be surrounded by artists who are constantly working and seeking collaboration. My peers fuel my fire constantly. I have also been following and contributing to the efforts of several blogs/zines in which I gain a great deal of inspiration from. Here are few links to my current favourites: If You Leave, Stay Young Zine, Lensblr.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AB: I am spending my summer with the local newspaper, interning with their photography department. It has been a huge learning experience.  The paper only has five staff photographers, so they are spread pretty thin. I chose to apply for the internship as a result of a recent critique I received at the Society for Photographic Education’s national conference in Baltimore. The critique was of a handful of my street images and a series I am continually working on of the local flea & farmers market. It was said this work was my weakest. Actually, I received some pretty harsh criticism from one of the reviewers. It was hard to swallow at first, especially when you have spent so much time working on something. After I sat and considered everything that was discussed, I saw it as a challenge to improve and grow.

I am also working on a photo-a-day project using Fuji Instax wide film. You can view the progress on my flickr here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AB: I can’t say I have had any official mentors. My high school journalism teacher was a huge influence in my desire to be an educator. She is one of the most inspirational women in my life. During my college career I had the pleasure of working under Laine Wyatt. She is an extraordinary woman from whom I have gained a great deal of insight as to what I want to say with my images. Her guidance and support throughout my senior year is something I will always cherish.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AB: I am currently living and working in Daytona Beach, Florida. While I was not born here, this is the city I grew up in. Everything here is familiar and safe in a sense. At times I find myself feeling stagnant, and I fear those moments show through my work. There is a lack of culture and opportunity in this town. The world knows it as a tourist-driven city, “the worlds most famous beach”. I know it as home, not by choice but by proximity. I don’t know anything except Daytona Beach as this is the only place I have burnt so deeply into my memory. Every inch of my growth, as a woman, as an artist, has been from this dirt. This all must sound so negative. It isn’t all there is here. We have managed to established community through our common interests and dreams somewhere amongst the rubble. The truth is I am hungry for something new. I want to continue to learn, to grow, and I know in order to do so I need to feed that hunger.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AB: Shoot weddings and pay off your debt! But seriously, put yourself out there. Fight for what drives you, what you love. Find someone you want to work with, whether it is interning or assisting, and don’t be afraid to reach out to him/her/them. Think of your scholastic experience as your potential energy, stored away waiting to be released, and your newfound graduate status as your kinetic energy. Put yourself out there and see what you can attract. Trust your instincts.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AB: Gosh. I know I want to apply to grad school and teach at some point. Overall, I want to find a space to do more than just exist. I want to find a city that speaks to me and find a way to be productive and happy there. I guess my plan B is to find a way to keep moving in a world that is constantly trying to create a standstill. I know I have some traveling to do. Can that just be my plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AB: It is extremely important to me to remain an active part of a creative community. There are so many outlets available through your local art scenes and the World Wide Web. Especially being out of school, it is nice to find a place to receive feedback on your work and to be able to discuss concepts and project goals. If something doesn’t exist near you, create it!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ALYSON BOWEN: Growing up I had wanted to be a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It was a wild dream inspired by my hospital visits and the surgeon who corrected my spine. He was constantly putting his effort into innovative ways to improve the lives of others. I found it fascinating and admirable. It wasn’t until my high school years that I decided I wanted to pursue art in some form or another. It was also in high school that I realized I wanted to teach.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AB: I have been finding a great deal of inspiration through collective efforts lately. I am lucky to be surrounded by artists who are constantly working and seeking collaboration. My peers fuel my fire constantly. I have also been following and contributing to the efforts of several blogs/zines in which I gain a great deal of inspiration from. Here are few links to my current favourites: If You Leave, Stay Young Zine, Lensblr.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AB: I am spending my summer with the local newspaper, interning with their photography department. It has been a huge learning experience.  The paper only has five staff photographers, so they are spread pretty thin. I chose to apply for the internship as a result of a recent critique I received at the Society for Photographic Education’s national conference in Baltimore. The critique was of a handful of my street images and a series I am continually working on of the local flea & farmers market. It was said this work was my weakest. Actually, I received some pretty harsh criticism from one of the reviewers. It was hard to swallow at first, especially when you have spent so much time working on something. After I sat and considered everything that was discussed, I saw it as a challenge to improve and grow.

I am also working on a photo-a-day project using Fuji Instax wide film. You can view the progress on my flickr here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AB: I can’t say I have had any official mentors. My high school journalism teacher was a huge influence in my desire to be an educator. She is one of the most inspirational women in my life. During my college career I had the pleasure of working under Laine Wyatt. She is an extraordinary woman from whom I have gained a great deal of insight as to what I want to say with my images. Her guidance and support throughout my senior year is something I will always cherish.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AB: I am currently living and working in Daytona Beach, Florida. While I was not born here, this is the city I grew up in. Everything here is familiar and safe in a sense. At times I find myself feeling stagnant, and I fear those moments show through my work. There is a lack of culture and opportunity in this town. The world knows it as a tourist-driven city, “the worlds most famous beach”. I know it as home, not by choice but by proximity. I don’t know anything except Daytona Beach as this is the only place I have burnt so deeply into my memory. Every inch of my growth, as a woman, as an artist, has been from this dirt. This all must sound so negative. It isn’t all there is here. We have managed to established community through our common interests and dreams somewhere amongst the rubble. The truth is I am hungry for something new. I want to continue to learn, to grow, and I know in order to do so I need to feed that hunger.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AB: Shoot weddings and pay off your debt! But seriously, put yourself out there. Fight for what drives you, what you love. Find someone you want to work with, whether it is interning or assisting, and don’t be afraid to reach out to him/her/them. Think of your scholastic experience as your potential energy, stored away waiting to be released, and your newfound graduate status as your kinetic energy. Put yourself out there and see what you can attract. Trust your instincts.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AB: Gosh. I know I want to apply to grad school and teach at some point. Overall, I want to find a space to do more than just exist. I want to find a city that speaks to me and find a way to be productive and happy there. I guess my plan B is to find a way to keep moving in a world that is constantly trying to create a standstill. I know I have some traveling to do. Can that just be my plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AB: It is extremely important to me to remain an active part of a creative community. There are so many outlets available through your local art scenes and the World Wide Web. Especially being out of school, it is nice to find a place to receive feedback on your work and to be able to discuss concepts and project goals. If something doesn’t exist near you, create it!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ALYSON BOWEN: Growing up I had wanted to be a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It was a wild dream inspired by my hospital visits and the surgeon who corrected my spine. He was constantly putting his effort into innovative ways to improve the lives of others. I found it fascinating and admirable. It wasn’t until my high school years that I decided I wanted to pursue art in some form or another. It was also in high school that I realized I wanted to teach.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AB: I have been finding a great deal of inspiration through collective efforts lately. I am lucky to be surrounded by artists who are constantly working and seeking collaboration. My peers fuel my fire constantly. I have also been following and contributing to the efforts of several blogs/zines in which I gain a great deal of inspiration from. Here are few links to my current favourites: If You Leave, Stay Young Zine, Lensblr.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AB: I am spending my summer with the local newspaper, interning with their photography department. It has been a huge learning experience.  The paper only has five staff photographers, so they are spread pretty thin. I chose to apply for the internship as a result of a recent critique I received at the Society for Photographic Education’s national conference in Baltimore. The critique was of a handful of my street images and a series I am continually working on of the local flea & farmers market. It was said this work was my weakest. Actually, I received some pretty harsh criticism from one of the reviewers. It was hard to swallow at first, especially when you have spent so much time working on something. After I sat and considered everything that was discussed, I saw it as a challenge to improve and grow.

I am also working on a photo-a-day project using Fuji Instax wide film. You can view the progress on my flickr here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AB: I can’t say I have had any official mentors. My high school journalism teacher was a huge influence in my desire to be an educator. She is one of the most inspirational women in my life. During my college career I had the pleasure of working under Laine Wyatt. She is an extraordinary woman from whom I have gained a great deal of insight as to what I want to say with my images. Her guidance and support throughout my senior year is something I will always cherish.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AB: I am currently living and working in Daytona Beach, Florida. While I was not born here, this is the city I grew up in. Everything here is familiar and safe in a sense. At times I find myself feeling stagnant, and I fear those moments show through my work. There is a lack of culture and opportunity in this town. The world knows it as a tourist-driven city, “the worlds most famous beach”. I know it as home, not by choice but by proximity. I don’t know anything except Daytona Beach as this is the only place I have burnt so deeply into my memory. Every inch of my growth, as a woman, as an artist, has been from this dirt. This all must sound so negative. It isn’t all there is here. We have managed to established community through our common interests and dreams somewhere amongst the rubble. The truth is I am hungry for something new. I want to continue to learn, to grow, and I know in order to do so I need to feed that hunger.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AB: Shoot weddings and pay off your debt! But seriously, put yourself out there. Fight for what drives you, what you love. Find someone you want to work with, whether it is interning or assisting, and don’t be afraid to reach out to him/her/them. Think of your scholastic experience as your potential energy, stored away waiting to be released, and your newfound graduate status as your kinetic energy. Put yourself out there and see what you can attract. Trust your instincts.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AB: Gosh. I know I want to apply to grad school and teach at some point. Overall, I want to find a space to do more than just exist. I want to find a city that speaks to me and find a way to be productive and happy there. I guess my plan B is to find a way to keep moving in a world that is constantly trying to create a standstill. I know I have some traveling to do. Can that just be my plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AB: It is extremely important to me to remain an active part of a creative community. There are so many outlets available through your local art scenes and the World Wide Web. Especially being out of school, it is nice to find a place to receive feedback on your work and to be able to discuss concepts and project goals. If something doesn’t exist near you, create it!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ALYSON BOWEN: Growing up I had wanted to be a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It was a wild dream inspired by my hospital visits and the surgeon who corrected my spine. He was constantly putting his effort into innovative ways to improve the lives of others. I found it fascinating and admirable. It wasn’t until my high school years that I decided I wanted to pursue art in some form or another. It was also in high school that I realized I wanted to teach.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AB: I have been finding a great deal of inspiration through collective efforts lately. I am lucky to be surrounded by artists who are constantly working and seeking collaboration. My peers fuel my fire constantly. I have also been following and contributing to the efforts of several blogs/zines in which I gain a great deal of inspiration from. Here are few links to my current favourites: If You Leave, Stay Young Zine, Lensblr.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AB: I am spending my summer with the local newspaper, interning with their photography department. It has been a huge learning experience.  The paper only has five staff photographers, so they are spread pretty thin. I chose to apply for the internship as a result of a recent critique I received at the Society for Photographic Education’s national conference in Baltimore. The critique was of a handful of my street images and a series I am continually working on of the local flea & farmers market. It was said this work was my weakest. Actually, I received some pretty harsh criticism from one of the reviewers. It was hard to swallow at first, especially when you have spent so much time working on something. After I sat and considered everything that was discussed, I saw it as a challenge to improve and grow.

I am also working on a photo-a-day project using Fuji Instax wide film. You can view the progress on my flickr here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AB: I can’t say I have had any official mentors. My high school journalism teacher was a huge influence in my desire to be an educator. She is one of the most inspirational women in my life. During my college career I had the pleasure of working under Laine Wyatt. She is an extraordinary woman from whom I have gained a great deal of insight as to what I want to say with my images. Her guidance and support throughout my senior year is something I will always cherish.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AB: I am currently living and working in Daytona Beach, Florida. While I was not born here, this is the city I grew up in. Everything here is familiar and safe in a sense. At times I find myself feeling stagnant, and I fear those moments show through my work. There is a lack of culture and opportunity in this town. The world knows it as a tourist-driven city, “the worlds most famous beach”. I know it as home, not by choice but by proximity. I don’t know anything except Daytona Beach as this is the only place I have burnt so deeply into my memory. Every inch of my growth, as a woman, as an artist, has been from this dirt. This all must sound so negative. It isn’t all there is here. We have managed to established community through our common interests and dreams somewhere amongst the rubble. The truth is I am hungry for something new. I want to continue to learn, to grow, and I know in order to do so I need to feed that hunger.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AB: Shoot weddings and pay off your debt! But seriously, put yourself out there. Fight for what drives you, what you love. Find someone you want to work with, whether it is interning or assisting, and don’t be afraid to reach out to him/her/them. Think of your scholastic experience as your potential energy, stored away waiting to be released, and your newfound graduate status as your kinetic energy. Put yourself out there and see what you can attract. Trust your instincts.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AB: Gosh. I know I want to apply to grad school and teach at some point. Overall, I want to find a space to do more than just exist. I want to find a city that speaks to me and find a way to be productive and happy there. I guess my plan B is to find a way to keep moving in a world that is constantly trying to create a standstill. I know I have some traveling to do. Can that just be my plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AB: It is extremely important to me to remain an active part of a creative community. There are so many outlets available through your local art scenes and the World Wide Web. Especially being out of school, it is nice to find a place to receive feedback on your work and to be able to discuss concepts and project goals. If something doesn’t exist near you, create it!

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ALYSON BOWEN: Growing up I had wanted to be a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. It was a wild dream inspired by my hospital visits and the surgeon who corrected my spine. He was constantly putting his effort into innovative ways to improve the lives of others. I found it fascinating and admirable. It wasn’t until my high school years that I decided I wanted to pursue art in some form or another. It was also in high school that I realized I wanted to teach.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AB: I have been finding a great deal of inspiration through collective efforts lately. I am lucky to be surrounded by artists who are constantly working and seeking collaboration. My peers fuel my fire constantly. I have also been following and contributing to the efforts of several blogs/zines in which I gain a great deal of inspiration from. Here are few links to my current favourites: If You Leave, Stay Young Zine, Lensblr.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AB: I am spending my summer with the local newspaper, interning with their photography department. It has been a huge learning experience. The paper only has five staff photographers, so they are spread pretty thin. I chose to apply for the internship as a result of a recent critique I received at the Society for Photographic Education’s national conference in Baltimore. The critique was of a handful of my street images and a series I am continually working on of the local flea & farmers market. It was said this work was my weakest. Actually, I received some pretty harsh criticism from one of the reviewers. It was hard to swallow at first, especially when you have spent so much time working on something. After I sat and considered everything that was discussed, I saw it as a challenge to improve and grow.

I am also working on a photo-a-day project using Fuji Instax wide film. You can view the progress on my flickr here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AB: I can’t say I have had any official mentors. My high school journalism teacher was a huge influence in my desire to be an educator. She is one of the most inspirational women in my life. During my college career I had the pleasure of working under Laine Wyatt. She is an extraordinary woman from whom I have gained a great deal of insight as to what I want to say with my images. Her guidance and support throughout my senior year is something I will always cherish.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AB: I am currently living and working in Daytona Beach, Florida. While I was not born here, this is the city I grew up in. Everything here is familiar and safe in a sense. At times I find myself feeling stagnant, and I fear those moments show through my work. There is a lack of culture and opportunity in this town. The world knows it as a tourist-driven city, “the worlds most famous beach”. I know it as home, not by choice but by proximity. I don’t know anything except Daytona Beach as this is the only place I have burnt so deeply into my memory. Every inch of my growth, as a woman, as an artist, has been from this dirt. This all must sound so negative. It isn’t all there is here. We have managed to established community through our common interests and dreams somewhere amongst the rubble. The truth is I am hungry for something new. I want to continue to learn, to grow, and I know in order to do so I need to feed that hunger.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AB: Shoot weddings and pay off your debt! But seriously, put yourself out there. Fight for what drives you, what you love. Find someone you want to work with, whether it is interning or assisting, and don’t be afraid to reach out to him/her/them. Think of your scholastic experience as your potential energy, stored away waiting to be released, and your newfound graduate status as your kinetic energy. Put yourself out there and see what you can attract. Trust your instincts.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AB: Gosh. I know I want to apply to grad school and teach at some point. Overall, I want to find a space to do more than just exist. I want to find a city that speaks to me and find a way to be productive and happy there. I guess my plan B is to find a way to keep moving in a world that is constantly trying to create a standstill. I know I have some traveling to do. Can that just be my plan B?

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AB: It is extremely important to me to remain an active part of a creative community. There are so many outlets available through your local art scenes and the World Wide Web. Especially being out of school, it is nice to find a place to receive feedback on your work and to be able to discuss concepts and project goals. If something doesn’t exist near you, create it!

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

TOBY MASON: I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to be when I grew up: I never really found a path. I had ideas about being an architect (as I liked drawing), or a landscape gardener (as I liked being outdoors). I don’t think I really started finding my way until I was well into my 20s, and by that time I had fallen into the wine trade..

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TM: I get inspired by the seasons in the UK, and at the moment we are heading from a changeable yet welcome -spring, into a (hopefully) warm and vibrant summer. But I try to live my life so that I am gaining new experiences, and going to new places whenever I can. That way it’s easy to become inspired.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TM: I have just had a visit from one of Japan’s finest Lomographers: Yoshitaka Goto aka Gocchin, which was a great opportunity to discuss ideas and techniques, as well as go on some photo-walks (and enjoy a beer or two). I’m also working on a couple of global film-swap projects. I have an exhibition starting soon in Canary Wharf in London, plus another show later in the year in Margate, with a fantastic screen-printer and designer, Zoe Murphy.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

TM: Not so much mentors, but I have been lucky enough to meet a few photographers whose work I have admired along the way, such as LomoKev, and Hodaka Yamamoto. I have gained a lot of inspiration through Flickr and Lomography contacts, as well as through meeting up with fellow analogue photographers in Brighton.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

TM: I have lived in Brighton, on the south coast of England for around 5 years now, with my wife and boys. I love it here by the sea, where there’s a rich mix of people, city life, seaside and beautiful countryside too. It has all the ingredients that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

TM: Do what you enjoy and hopefully the results will follow. If you are enjoying how and what you shoot, then you’ll want to keep doing it, and the more pictures you take, the more chance you have of achieving the images that you hope for.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

TM: Well, photography has only ever been a hobby for me, so I don’t really have the need for a plan b… Really it’s just a case of keeping on shooting film, experimenting and trying to push myself to get better and better. I’d love to have some work published, but I guess that’s a little way away.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

TM: I think so – many ideas have come to fruition through conversations with other analogue photographers, it’s great to gain inspiration as well as feedback from communities either online or with local meets. But the most important thing for me is to get out and about shooting film, as I’m not taking pictures if I’m stuck in front of the laptop!

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARYAM KHASTOO: In all honesty when I was around 8 I wanted to be a conductor. Classical music was always played in our house and my dad and I would pretend to be conducting the music.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MK: When it comes to people I photograph for my projects, I can’t help but to be drawn to people who inspire me. My mum for one. She inspires me constantly and in my work. I am currently working on a project about her - Maman.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MK: I’ve just finished writing English subtitles for a feature film. Now, my intention is to have an exhibition within the next year. Nothing planned but it’s what I’m aiming towards.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MK: Definitely. There are a few people who’s opinions have helped me a great deal. Most of whom are related to me. When it comes to artists who have inspired me I always mention the impeccable Julia Margaret Cameron. Her portraits ooze warmth, realism and are also very expressive; they are the traits that I try to capture in my work.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MK: I’m based in Tehran, Iran at the moment. It’s been interesting to say the least. It has helped me a great deal regarding work. I have been working on a couple of projects here which have meant a great deal to me. I definitely wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work on the IRANIAN project elsewhere - for obvious reasons.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MK: My advice to anyone interested in photography is to take a lot of pictures, look at a lot of photographs from photographers all over the world, start with an analog camera, make sure you are open to constructive criticism and try to capture things that are interesting to the eye. There has to be something in a photograph that can grab your attention and move you. It can be of anything but it has to be interesting. Be it the affect you give, the composition you use or the subject. It can be many things… (Sorry, that was more than one advice)

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MK: I’m still working really hard on plan A, I don’t intend on giving up just yet. So, I’m afraid no plan B as of now.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MK: Yes and no. It’s also important to be among non creative types. You can be inspired by other people, not only creative minds.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______,  wherever they may be located.

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MAURY GORTEMILLER: In the following order: astronaut, photographer, demolitions expert, actuary.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: This is probably the least interesting or original answer that I could give, but I’m inspired currently by the summer morning light. I’ve never been a morning person - far from it. Over the past two weeks, I’ve left the apartment before sunrise and walked the city for two hours, prowling for photographs. I’m inspired by the quality of light which is entirely new to me, as well as the detritus of the previous evening strewn across the neighborhood. Recent finds: discarded hair extensions and a tattered copy of Sex in History (Abacus, 1989) beside a dandelion in the Bank of America parking lot

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Making pictures and not thinking about them in terms of an edit or sequence. Over the past six months I edited two personal series which are now finished: All-Time Lotion and a book of my competitive apnea project. So far I’ve photographed relatively little in 2014. I am now throwing myself into photographing that which attracts me… period. To paraphrase Gregory Halpern, the nature of attraction is so strange and ineffable, and delightfully so, that I’m not questioning the what or why of photographs at the moment.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Oh sure. Photography professors, friends with far more talent and vision than I, and Frank Stanford via his book The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. It’s a 15,000 line one-sentence poem birthed from the fields of the Mississippi Delta and the mountains of Western Arkansas. The book contains a irresistible brew of tall tales, dirty jokes, dreams and a series of most unreliable narrators. I read the book four years ago and I’ll never read it again - it’s far too cathartic and exhausting and exhilarating. I revisit various passages quite frequently however.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: I live in Atlanta, GA, on Ponce de Leon Avenue near the Clermont Lounge. The area has a lot to offer in terms of photography, adventure and general hi-jinks. And it’s surprisingly walkable - most of what I need on a daily basis can be found on foot. There’s a thriving visual arts scene here as well. Is Atlanta shaping me? Yes, in the sense that I prefer to make work where there’s an agreeable amount of heat, light and tacos. These conditions make me more agreeable which has to impact the work at some point.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Know that some projects take years to gestate. Many graduates are ready to crank out new work, share the images via social media and then attempt to exhibit as soon as possible. You have to chill out, think about what you’re doing, make work, set the work aside for months, edit for a few more months, live your life, etc. And this is utterly positive: you and the work have time to mutate and grow. Time to not only make more work but to learn to live as an artist.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: There is no plan B - this is it. I’m here to express myself visually.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: Yes, but not necessarily in terms of a local scene. It’s far more important to communicate with friends, colleagues to share work and talk about ______, wherever they may be located.