• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SIGRID BJORBEKKMO: When I was very little I wanted to be a gardener and an air hostess. Where I grew up we had a big garden and I used to spend a lot of time outside with my mother. I used to help her while she taught me the names of all the different flowers and plants. I dreamt of one day owning my own garden and look after plants for a living. Another thing that fascinated me was airplanes, and air hostesses in particular. They were always so friendly and happy, and I wanted to be like them. Traveling the world, looking elegant in a suit and heels. I outgrew those ambitions pretty quickly and have had lots of passing dreams and plans since then. Although I believe I am still trying to figure things out, photography is one thing that has been sticking with me for the longest.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SB: I always find music inspiring. Right now I am listening to King Krule, some tracks from The Busy Twist and Arctic Monkeys. Also traveling, the changing weather and my parents photo albums from the 70. I spend a lot of my time looking up other photographers and photographic series on the internet. I have a few I always go back to for inspiration, like Jody Rogac's portraits, Alana Paterson's images of farm life and the outdoors, Spencer Murphy's projects, my friend Ena Kreso's beautiful images.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SB: Right now I have just finished a portrait story for the british magazine Boys by Girls. I am also working on an ongoing personal project about the notion of home and how we feel about our home place when we grow older. I have been lucky to receive a grant to make it into an exhibition next year. Other things I am up to right now is preparing myself mentally for colder days, watching game of thrones, and planning new travels.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SB: I had a couple of teacher in school that meant a great deal to me. One of them was a former photo editor for PDN. She made me feel that I had something to contribute with in a market already filled to the edge with new impressions and up­and­coming photographers. I also have a few close friends that always give me support and advice if I need.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SB: Oslo has been my home for the past five years. I really love it. It is happening a lot of exciting things here now, new neighbourhoods being built and cool restaurants and bars popping up in the old ones. It is not the prettiest city at a first glance, but it has so many hidden gems that one discovers after living here for a while. Although Oslo is a lot bigger than the small town I grew up in, it can sometimes feel quite small. The photographic community feels very limited and there is not as much culture and opportunities as a would like.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SB: Have patience, it usually takes some time to get where you want. Shoot own projects, don’t hang around waiting to get assignments. Shoot whatever you love to shoot, and set yourself goals for the future.

JC: If all else fails ­ what is your plan B?

SB: No plan B at the moment. I haven’t quite ruled out getting more education in the future but at the moment I just want to give myself some time to focus on photography and see where it gets me.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SB: I am happy working alone and most of my ideas comes from me just working by myself, but I believe it is important to have someone you can share your work with and that will give you feedback on projects and new ideas. I have a couple of friends from school that are in the same situation as me, who can always understand my thoughts and struggles. I also think it is important to keep yourself updated on other photographers and the market.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY:  Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

HARRY GOULD HARVEY: Growing up I didn’t exactly have a specific path that I sought out. I was somewhat out of control, going in any direction that would take me. I didn’t have much time to think of what I wanted to be. I guess I am more interested and have always been interested in surviving to the best of my ability. Art is, and always has been, some sort of safe haven / escape for me, so unintentionally I guess maybe I always wanted to be an artist.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

HGH: Friends, peers and artists who push their medium always inspire me. Also, anyone with a hustle that’s really grinding away at what they do best. I continue to be inspired by the world that I exist in, the community of peers that live within the hardcore / punk community. I have a select group of friends that I am periodically making posts about them - if it wasn’t for them i’m not sure where i would be within this process so they are incredibly inspiring. If I were to go and make a list I would be forgetting a few because people inspire me for different reasons. There are working editorial photographers that are always pushing the confines of an assignment that always seem to blow my mind; Here are a few who inspire me the most in the field: Bobby Doherty, Joe Leavenworth, Eva O’Leary, Ryan Lowry, Thomas Prior. Lately I have been super interested in painting, a couple painters who’s work I respond best to: Will Boone, Torey Thornton and Ben Horns. Then there are a couple artists who inspire me to not work within a specific medium: Daniel Shea, Bennet Schlesinger, Adam Kremer. Obviously this list can go on, there are so many others who inspire me every day.

JC: What are you up to right now?

HGH: Right now I am working on a large untitled body of work. Imagery based around the surfaces and culture I encounter while being involved in punk. Interested in the space that this world exists in. Also have making objects and sculptures that are hopefully pushing the idea of a documentation image making and recording of surface. I have been making positives and negatives with clay and plaster, making an index and casting walls from the space in which punk shows take place. Eventually these casts are meant to be mixed in with imagery of the culture based on surface and fantasy. With this new work, what interests me is bridging the connection between the space where this cultural occurrence exists, the studio, and eventually the gallery wall. Along with working on this project I continue to work professionally as an editorial photographer, doing magazine work etc. This practice and aesthetic definitely seems to inform the commercial style of some of the images made in the project.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

HGH: Of-course! I always seem to be working back and forth with friends, bouncing ideas etc. Some of the artist I listed who inspire me could be considered mentors. But what is great about them is the fact that no matter where they are placed within the scale of success they are down to earth and they don’t place the hierarchy of being a mentor over what I doing.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

HGH: I am based in Newport RI but always working in NYC. I am realistically spending half my time both places. Newport RI is a beautiful old city with beaches and great food. One thing that that is great about living in newport is I have plenty of room to work on photography, painting and sculpture. Some would think traveling back and forth to the city would be taxing, but it is one of my favorite times, I get to truly relax while letting my mind wander about projects.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

HGH: Always something, I wont ever not have some type of hustle. I seem to like to go on tour with punk bands. There’s a lot of money in doing that sort of thing, so I guess that could be my plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community? Yea. 100% -

HGH: If you don’t have a creative community, seek out other creative people you admire and create one.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

STEPHEN MARK: As a four year old I wanted to be a tramp. Maybe it had something to do with being outdoors. I was often found standing under torrential rain while everyone else was warm inside. I still do it now, just with a camera in my hand.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SM: In this digital age, I’m constantly drawn back to researching traditional photographic techniques. Like many landscape photographers, I’m a big fan of Ansel Adams and I’m currently revisiting The Zone System using Adam’s book The Negative.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SM: I am married to Sarah and we recently had our first child, so I am enjoying my new role as a dad. I work as a Creative Trainer for a leading technology company based in California.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SM: I’ve met lots of inspirational people along the way, but the people who have made the biggest impact on my creativity are not creative types at all. They have helped hone my ability to communicate and have given me a grounding in what’s really important in life.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SM: I live in a village in Liverpool where Paul McCartney and John Lennon met. The city has a heritage of creativity, and you can feel it when you walk around town. It has to be the friendliest city in the world.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SM: In all you do, try to maintain an enjoyment of your craft. I reached a point soon after graduating, where the sound of the shutter release wasn’t followed by the sound of money. We produce for others to consume, but it is so important to keep something just for you, to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. For me, that’s going out into the wilderness to find some solitude, regardless of how many prints result from my time there.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SM: It can be good sometimes to step back and evaluate what’s really important. We get so consumed by our work, but if we’re not careful it can be to the detriment of those around us. In many ways, I have chosen to make photography my Plan B because being a husband and a dad is my Plan A.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SM: It is so important to be part of a community, but i’m not overly concerned if it’s not made up of creatives. There is a lot to be said for spending time with people you have nothing in common with.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be when you grew up?

THOMAS GARDINER: When I grew up my father put me in almost every sport there was. Subsequently, for most of my childhood I wanted to be a professional football player. However, I also drew a lot as a child and really loved to watch cartoons. I think deep down I always saw myself eventually becoming a cartoonist, or something related to drawing or picture making.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

TG: I just recently moved from Edmonton, Alberta to Vancouver. It has been a long time since I’ve traveled through the Rockies and I thought my drive to Vancouver was tremendously inspiring.

JC: What are you up to right now?

TG: I’m just trying to get myself set up in Vancouver at the moment. I’ve been working, doing odd jobs in construction and warehouse type of stuff. I’m just trying to save up so that I can start up a studio as soon as possible.

JC: Where are you based right now, how is it shaping you?

TG: I’ve only been here in Vancouver for about 2 months and although I used to live here over 8 years ago, it’s too early for me to get a sense how it is shaping me at this moment.

All I have at this time are goals and expectations and, as with anything, it’s not until these perhaps begin to fail and I have to adapt to changes that I’ll gain more of a sense of perspective to better answer the question.

JC: One piece of advice you would give to photography graduates.

TG: I think that if anything, being in school and participating in the process of a formal critique is a kind of setting where a student must not only confront, but also overcome certain obstacles and problems along the way of finding their own personal artistic progression. Sometimes this process can be extremely frustrating, but whether you’re in school or out of school, obstacles never really cease to present themselves.

I guess if I had to say anything about this whole process it would be that when you’re most frustrated or stuck by encountering things that get in your way, these are usually the moments when you’re actually the most productive. Although it may be easy to get caught up in the usual set of self-defeating notions along the way, you ultimately have to find a way to recognize that such ideas are merely distractions. What’s actually happening in these situations is that you’re becoming more aware of a greater need for a more nuanced and complicated approach to a subject- maybe even the same subject you’ve seen a thousand times already - that hadn’t occurred to you before. The frustration is merely part of the process of acquiring a new language or whatever it is you inevitably create for yourself that ultimately leads to greater ends.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

TG: I think I’m way beyond plan B… I might be closer to plan E or F at this point?

JC: Is it important for you to be part of a creative community?

TG: I would say that I very much enjoy being part of a creative community, but I wouldn’t say that it’s necessary for me when I make my work. But I do think there are times when it’s essential for any artist to have access to such communities.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.
 
So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: How did the series Lots of Cake! come about?

LAURA CURRAN: Lots of Cake! came about just after I graduated from my MFA in photography. Our class were in a group show in Dublin straight after graduation. For my graduation dinner my mum made a fantastic afternoon tea, and as we were travelling to Dublin the next day, packed the leftovers up in a picnic basket, with a bottle of champagne and sent me off to Dublin to share it with my class.

When we were half way through the difficult hang in the gallery, I laid the goodies out on the table, popped the champagne and we all tucked into the beautiful food. It was a great way to continue the celebration from the day before. When driving to our opening that night, my classmate said you know what, the way your mum does things is wonderful, you should really think of documenting it I had never thought about it before, I suppose you almost take those things for granted.   So I did. I started by documenting celebrations, the food, the costumes, how the spaces throughout the house change when the family were getting together. Looking at a space you inhabit in this way changes your perspective a lot, even your perception of the everyday.

So the project grew from images of celebration to images of the everyday, the preparation and even the aftermath of events. It was only after working through these motifs for a while that I came to understand the purpose that celebration played in our family life. My mum used these times of joy as a sort of escapism. From planning the theme and the menu, to preparing the food and transforming our home, all were an escape which lead to an overall performance, (in the party) which then led back too the everyday again. I loved seeing this cycle of transformation, and I loved seeing it fulfilled with such creativity on my mums part. That’s why I really had to feature her handwritten recipes. My mum would sit on the laptop searching for food to help fulfil her theme and write it down, she has a folder full of ideas for every occasion. These were really key in showing this process of thinking, planning, escaping. Jotted down on any available piece of paper.

JC: Why did you feel so strongly about making this work into book format?

LC: When I set out making the work I didn’t have a clear idea of what the end result would be, both in terms of the pictures and the format. But as I worked my way through it I felt that a book would be the best way for the viewer to experience the images. The whole family always meets these celebrations with great anticipation and I think the book gives the viewer that same sense of anticipation.

JC: Looking back at the work now that it is finished what have you learnt?

LC: That projects evolve. Those pictures that you take at the beginning, that seem inconsequential can be such a big part of the overall narrative. I feel you must spend a lot of time reviewing, seeing what reveals itself. My understanding of this project was only revealed to me as I was making it, and being open to this learning process is really important.

JC: What challenges did you face when producing the book?

LC: Self publishing was something very new to me, so producing Lots of Cake! was a steep learning curve, but a rewarding one. When you self-publish work you are everything to the project, creator, designer, publicist, distributer and this can at time be challenging in terms of the workload, but definitely a great learning experience. One that I would not change.

JC: Talk us through a couple of significant images within the book and how/why were they made?

LC: One image that was quite a significant turning point in creating the work was the second image (above).

This was what you would call a happy accident. I always try to keep the presence of kit to a minimum when making any work, so I wouldn’t carry a tripod, or use flash, meaning I would need to set the camera on either the table or the ground when shooting in low light, creating these types of abstract images. When I scanned this neg I thought this sense of abstraction was really beautiful, the figure is obscured, giving the viewer a glimpse but not revealing them completely. I feel this works in the same way as the costumes, these people are never fully revealed to the viewer, adding to the idea that these celebrations are a type of suspended reality.

Another significant image in the series is the pile of washing on the stairs (above).

I began photographing images of the everyday after documenting the celebrations and I began to notice how creative my mother is, even in those everyday tasks like the washing and ironing. Leaving individual piles of clothes for each family member to lift as they run past.

JC: How did you find the curation process? Were there challenges? What was successful?

LC: When putting the book together I tried to almost think of the spreads as if they were the wall with the placement of each image being significant in how the book reads.

I mention in my statement Todov’s narrative theory, which in its most basic terms discusses the idea of going from a state of equilibrium, to dis equilibrium, back to equilibrium again and I feel that this applies greatly to these celebrations in relation to the everyday. So the images are placed a varying heights on the page in relation to this theory.

JC: What would your advice be to someone thinking about creating a book of their own?

LC: To do it. I had the same fears that I’m sure many others have, where will I get the money? What if I don’t sell them? Will I understand everything about the process to make it work? You just have to believe in the work and be open to learning a lot of new things to make it happen. Another piece of advice would be to think about crowdfunding as an option to gather funds. My reward system for Kickstarter was essentially a pre ordering system, meaning I had a portion of the edition sold before it was produced, meaning it was out in the world before the hefty job of publicising it began. And because the whole edition was fully funded, it gives you the scope to send copies off to reviewers and magazines to get exposure, without worrying about the cost.

JC: Whats next?

LC: I have a book launch in Belfast exposed photography gallery on the 4th of September to promote the book and I am hoping to have a solo show of the project in the near future… oh and sleep!

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHAEL GEORGE: A veterinarian. Hands down. There was an animal clinic not too far from my house growing up and whenever we had to take my dog in for a checkup I would peek into the back room and watch the vets use all of the nonsensical scientific instruments with wide little eyes. I have a slightly absurd love for all animals and I know I will inevitably be that guy who treats his dog like a child.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MG: I want to live in the color tones from the show Looking on HBO. The novel TransAtlantic by Colum McCann is helping me escape from my time on the subway. Visually I have recently been falling for Jamie Hawkesworth's portraits.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MG: Right now? Answering emails in my underwear. In a broader sense I am looking forward to translating my multimedia project Portrait of a Pilgrim into a printed book. My big goal for this year is to tackle my student loans and find work that is more in line with my personal photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MG: Jake Stangel and Ryan Pfluger are both good friends and longtime idols. Without them I don’t think I would be anywhere near where I am today. Their talent shows no bounds and they’re so generous when it comes to keeping me from feeling lost in the industry.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MG: Brooklyn, New York and it is kicking my ass, but that’s why I live here. New York is the most beautiful mess and I find myself smothered with inspiration from theater, comedy, art shows, and fellow freelancers on a daily basis. However I live right next to Prospect Park and I make it a point to find a balance between retreating upstate for a hike, running in the park, and diving into the city. People don’t think it’s possible to live here as a creative and have a life that isn’t completely manic. I like to think I break that mold.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MG: Lock every camera you have in a fire safe for a week. Travel for a few days, spend time with people you love, and try to find the most beautiful sunset in your city. If you spend half that time feeling tortured and in pain like you might explode if you experience anymore splendor without a camera, then go to that fire safe, take everything out, and proceed as normal. If you feel relieved and rather nonchalant then you should probably give up now because there are plenty of people who need to take photographs that will leave you in the dust.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MG: I thrive on community, positivity, and activism. If I were to give up now it is likely I would head straight for a career working at a non-profit fighting for LGBT rights or arts education funding.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MG: It isn’t just important it is necessary. Being a freelancer is like living in a circle of people who are all pushing each other forward.

@mullitovercc