• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

BENJAMIN FREEDMAN: First I wanted to be a pig. Then a skunk. Then an orthopedist. Then a filmmaker. Then a photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

BF: I actually just purchased Art Forms in Nature by Karl Blossfeldt. I studied his work pretty intensely a couple years ago. He became a huge inspiration for a while. Looking through this book now, I’m still finding something new to look at. The images are extremely meditative but also scientific. I also just really admire his work ethic. He was pretty amazing. Other photographers I’ve been looking at are Jamie Hawkesworth, Adi Nes, Margaux Roy and Zachary Norman. I’m also reading this great book right now called The Significance of the Photographic Image in a Filmic Context by Paulius Petraitis. I love that stuff.

JC: What are you up to right now?

BF: Right now I’m in the middle of packing up my room. I’m moving all my belongings into storage. It’s really amazing what kind of shit you’ll find after living in the same place for four years. I’m about to head off on a crazy adventure to Israel, Turkey, Italy and Berlin. I’ll also be going to Iceland in November for a two month artist residency. It’s sort of freaking me out but should be an interesting time…

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

BF: So many. I’ve been under the wing of many inspirational people who have invested so much time and energy into me. I’m very lucky.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

BF: Although coming from Montreal, I’m based out of Toronto right now. I’ve been living here for almost five years. Toronto has a pretty great art scene. There is always something happening and although not functioning on the same scale as some other cities, Toronto has its own charm and personality that i’ve come to really appreciate. It’s a pretty accessible world with many contributors.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

BF: Well you just cant stop learning. It’s a funny thing that happens when people graduate. Suddenly they put their cameras down and take a step back. This is important. Unfortunately, it’s very hard for some people to pick it back up. For me, photography is a muscle that needs constant attention. I suffer through strange droughts where I don’t feel the desire to make images but I always come back. If i don’t take photographs, that creative muscle gets weaker and weaker. Its a strange phenomenon to explain. Also go to galleries. See what is happening in your city. Form opinions!! Read books and engage.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B

BF: Its a funny question because for me, in a lot of ways, I can’t have a plan B for plan A to work.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

BF: Of course! I’m always somewhere between exhausted, challenged, inspired and completely motivated by the creative community I surround myself with.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GEORGE MILES: I come from a generation that grew up watching programmes like ‘Threads’ and seeing Protect & Survive public information films on the television. Like many, I was certain there would be an all out nuclear war before I left school. That absolved me from any decision making, that mindset has kind of stuck ever since. Every year since 1987 has been a bonus. I’m still very wary of anyone with definite goals in life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GM: The way the light is shifting into Autumn, the quietness settling in the hedgerows. Trees, always trees. Instagram. And The Real Housewives of Atlanta on TV.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GM: I’m in the middle of preparations for the forthcoming release of my first book Views of Matlock Bath with Black Dog Publishing. For some ridiculous reason I’m doing two concurrent shows to launch it in Matlock Bath and Nottingham along with a couple of signings at The Photographers’ Gallery and Nottingham Contemporary.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GM: Stephen Shore mentored me throughout the entire Views of Matlock Bath project. I am incredibly fortunate to have had that experience. In its own way, the valley where I made that work also taught me a great deal.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GM: In a weird town just outside Nottingham in the England. It’s amazing - its oddness and dark humour strikes a chord with me, there are pictures everywhere.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GM: Keep making work, no matter what. For those that have just graduated, this time of year is the weirdest. Most have been in full time education all their lives; going back to school of some sort every September. Now they have nowhere to go and no deadlines - the freedom can be overwhelming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GM: No plan B; no plan A. No goals; no failures. Just keep making pictures. If they ask questions about the world, myself, or the medium itself, then all the better. If they get seen by others then that’s great, but not the primary goal. So I’m grateful for the exposure from this interview.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GM: Not really, but it helps to find a tradition that you identify with. Of course then you have to figure out how you fit into it without merely regurgitating the same old tropes. I often think of Constable’s quote When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. Which is almost impossible of course, but worth aspiring to nonetheless.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MICHEL NGUIE: I wanted to be happy and feel free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MN: The Bible, THTF, William Blake, lemon flavor, Stromae : Tous les mêmes, Rembrandt, chill’ in Paris, mommy, Juliette Gaudino, the color orange, Geneva, Nino Ferrer : Le Sud, Gilbert Cesbron, the idea of ​​eternity, Basil Wolverton, Alain Auderset, the light, dogs and certainly many other things.

JC: What have you up to right now?

MN: Earlier this year I opened two exhibition in Paris, the first one is called Boarderline in le Marais area (Paris 3e) and the second one in Belleville (Paris 20e) called Petit Christ.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MN: I don’t think so.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MN: Right now I’m based in Bordeaux (south of France) for the shaping aspect to be honest I don’t know, this is my native town so I suppose that it must have an important impact on what I am today.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MN: In my part I’m self educated, I run on instinct, I make do with what I have, depending on the circumstances and opportunities that I meet on my way, so an advice : work hard, work hard, work hard…

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MN: All? How? Which plan B? For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. If I don’t have love, I am nothing. how to consider a plan B? For misfortune? If all else fails I dare to hope that I would fight until the end.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MN: In my opinion photography maintains a kind of loneliness so collaborative work is complicated.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JADE BERRY: This is such a funny question because I wanted to be all sorts; vet, artist, dancer, musician or a fashion designer. I still love animals but my creativity always took over. From a young age i was always outside, entertaining myself by making things, drawing and painting. With help of both my granddads I grew a interest in photography, they taught me a few basics and I got obsessed with film and analogue cameras. I was never one of those that loathed over technology. I taught myself to use film, how to process and print in the darkroom. From the age of 13 I fell in love with photography and used it as a way of speaking to others.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JB: Life is my main inspiration. There are so many people that can inspire you on a day to day basis and you can put that into your own format of being inspired. I look at everything around me and it sets my imagination off. Also being sad can make me think strange things to get my mind off being stressed etc.

Photographers that inspire me at the moment are : Olivia Bee, Wiissa, Hana Haley and Sophie Davidson. All beautiful photography which is influenced by life. Nan Goldin and Corinne Day inspire me always, they are the mothers of photography. Tim Walker is one of my biggest influences because he doesn’t hold back & of course David Bowie!

JC: What are you up to right now?

JB: Trying to find some brands to do some photography work/experience/collaboration with to push myself further and eating caramel digestives with green tea, delicious.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JB: My friends.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JB: I’m based in Newquay, Cornwall. This is where I’m from and it is so beautiful here, such an inspiring place because I’m always by the sea. I’m just finishing my degree this year, so far things are looking up.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JB: I’m just about to become a photography graduate but my advice would be to stick to being yourself, as in within your work, I have always had a style and way of shooting and I feel sticking to being yourself is the best thing to do.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JB: I would also love to be a creative director in photography and film and to have my own book design / printing company. I have just made my first moving image piece which you can view here.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JB: Very important but its not always possible. If you surround yourself with inspiring people and really good friends I think you can thrive in your own way. My friends have really helped me be more confident in my photography and they are all creative in there own way.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural 
environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new  generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

PAT VALADE: I wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was quite young, and I wanted to be a musician, photography came about later in life but now I couldn’t/wouldn’t want to do anything else.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

PV: Lately I have been inspired by a number of things. The resurgence of small print based publications is incredibly important, also the joy of working collaboratively with other artists. I am constantly surrounded by talented people, Noah Spivak, Mikhayla Roht, David Roth, and the work of people I look up to such as Scott Pommier, Tim Barber, Arto Saari to name a few. I’m always inspired by design, light, music and the natural environment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

PV: Currently I am planning a 10,000 KM photo/motorcycle trip for the end of the summer documenting certain issues across Canada and the US. I am also working on a collaborative project that brings photographers, filmakers, designers and local artists together which I am very excited about.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

PV: I have been lucky in that I have met a lot of encouraging professionals in my photo life so far, sometimes I find the photography community has a tendency of being a little too doomsday about the photo industry, and I’ve been lucky in my life to have met people as enthusiastic about photography as I am. I can’t thank people like Andrew Snucins and Marshal Chupa for motivating me to take photography seriously. Arni Haraldsson, Kyla Mallett, Steven Waddell and Scott Connaroe have been a huge help in beating down the ego.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

PV: I am currently based in Vancouver, BC on the west coast of Canada. The amount of creative people on the West Coast is staggering, and more and more I find myself working on projects outside of strictly photography and to me this is very exciting, I think photography is very open at this point in time, and working with people passionate about where they live and what they do is something that I love.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

PV: I think it is important for anyone to realize that in this day and age you have to create your own opportunities. The importance of photography has changed, it’s up to a new generation of artists to decide why it’s still one of the most important art forms.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

PV: My plan B is to not have a plan B therefore making plan A the only option.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

PV: One of the reasons I love photography so much is because it has allowed me to meet so many amazing and creative people, being part of a creative community is immensely important to me. Having people to bounce ideas off of, get critical feedback and having people around to inspire you everyday is why I love what I do so much.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CORY HARRISION SMITH: A landscape architect. I was obsessed with my family’s yard when I was a kid. I drove my dad nuts, the poor guy. I’d sprinkle extra fertilizer on the sly or overwater the lawn in the middle of the day – really dumb, unlikeable habits in retrospect. I don’t know what happened to this strange passion of mine. I used to know what the 3-digit number on the front of fertilizer bags means, but now I cant even keep up with weed-whacking my tiny city backyard.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CHS: I’m reading some Murakami now, which puts me in a nice headspace, but mostly I can’t stop thinking about Infinite Jest, which I finished last spring. Its breadth and structure are particularly inspiring as a photographer. Dave Eggers likened its structure to a spaceship, which is exactly what a good photo book should be like. In the photo world, I think that the guys at Houseboat are producing really interesting, fun books that feel both spontaneous and smartly crafted. I should also mention Eric Copeland’s live show.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CHS: I’m trying to shoot more and have faith that interesting projects will come to fruition if I’m constantly creating. I have a lot of ideas, but I’m trying to photograph in a more fluid, free way. It’s easy to get bogged down by words.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CHS: Not since school. I was fortunate enough to have had an independent study with Rebecca Michaels at Tyler. She was always very generous with her time, especially considering I wasn’t even a photo major. She’s very insightful and has a knack for steering you in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CHS: I’ve lived in Philadelphia for over six years. I like that I can afford to live in an entire house, and that I know the city really well at this point. It feels like home for sure.

I haven’t photographed much in the city until lately though. I’d like to finish a Philadelphia project this year. I feel there is significant work to be made here, particularly along the outskirts. There’s certainly no shortage of urban planning failures, many of which make great stages for making work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CHS: I think it’s important to make work constantly, but to not feel pressure to bang out multiple projects every year. Quick and off-the-cuff can be satisfying, but most good work takes time to mature and realize itself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CHS: Return to delivering Thai food for the crazed Venezuelan woman I worked for over college summers.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CHS: I’m a bit ambivalent about this. I’m disappointed to admit that the Internet is a community for myself in any capacity, but I think maybe that train of thought is bogus. There are certainly a lot of great photo sites online, and I’m grateful to have discovered so much great work through them. I’ve also been able to witness artists my age grow artistically in a very transparent way that would not have been as visible if not for the Internet. This is a one-sided relationship, but it is a community of sorts I suppose. And of course having people in your life who are constantly creating things is the most important.

@mullitovercc