• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches.
Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I 
doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches.
Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I 
doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches.
Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I 
doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches.
Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I 
doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches.
Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I 
doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

AL OVERDRIVE: A scientist, it appealed to my sense of wonder and curiosity. I always loved finding out the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ things are the way they are. So at school when they made us pick our subjects for advanced study, I had to drop my arts and textiles classes to focus on history and the sciences. Our biology teacher was a keen photographer and in our final year he took our portraits and taught us how to develop and print black and white film. I had never considered taking photography ‘seriously’ until after I left university, but this all changed when I began a job in forensics where I had to photograph evidence and crime scenes for court. Eventually I had to choose between working in science, or working as a creative photographer.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AO: Pretty much everything and everyone ! Sometimes I see an image or a moment in a film I’m watching and I love the mood that the lighting or pose evokes. ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ has a really nice gritty, art house inspired feel to it. Lighting wise I’d consider my approach and style much more inspired by cinema than by photography. A couple of years ago I was drawn to the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi (primarily concerned with the acceptance of impermanence and imperfection), which is really inspiring my personal work. After years of shooting images with strong and even lighting, it took me a while to unlearn all this and embrace more conceptual approaches. Last year I came across David Lynch’s book ‘catching the big fish’ where he talks a lot about his meditations and how he approaches his films. That’s really inspired me, and changed how I view his films.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AO: Wrapping up an edit for some recent work Secret Cinema commissioned me for (which I can’t tell you about just yet). For those that don’t know, they put on events where you are immersed in a world created around world of the movie/album, where the guests and actors interact freely. Last year Laura Marling and Secret Cinema created a world based around her album ‘Once I was an Eagle’ which I was brought in to create a permanent record of. It was a fun collaboration and I’m glad to say she liked my interpretation and was really cooperative with helping me achieve the vision I had.

We are also in the planning stages for a collaboration with ‘head artist’ Philip Levine and designer Annike Flo to re-interpret the tale of the snails and Buddah. There are some great idea’s being discussed and I’m looking forward to shooting it.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AO: Not really, I have no formal education in photography apart form the training I undertook when I worked in forensics, so I’ve not really had a chance to meet a photographer in a position to be a mentor to me. I’m lucky and have a few friends whom I’ve worked with that are really supportive of my efforts who’s opinions I really respect. I think the drive has to come from within, and you have to learn to balance the self-doubt every creative has with faith in the value of your vision. Although I have no regrets about the decisions and experiences that led to me becoming a working photographer (I loath to use the term ‘professional’) I have sometimes been curious and wondered what I would have been like to have studied photography at university and had access to tutors and mentors of that ilk.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AO: East London, UK. People say if you tire of London you are tired of life itself, and after returning to the UK after living in California I now understand what they mean. It’s an expensive, overcrowded city with a fluid population, so it can be hard for people to develop a stable identity, but this is part of what makes it worth living in! There are so many exhibitions on at any given moments, it is a gift to anyone who is seeking inspiration. It’s musical history and role in the fashion world means that you are spoilt for choice when it comes to events and experiences, as well as bars and dining. If I didn’t live in London I doubt I would have become involved in fashion week, or even in fashion photography. The competition here is fierce, so it is also shaping me by never letting me rest on my laurels or become complacent.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AO: Professionally, treat others as you would like to be treated - I’ve seen a lot of people who are talented but are in such a rush to become a ‘brand’ or ‘big name’ that they trample all over the people who are around them. That approach may have worked in the old days, but most people I’ve met would rather work with someone they can trust than people whos only interest in the project is “what’s in it for me?”. If you work hard, have talent and are easy to work with, you’ll get a lot further than on talent alone.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AO: This is plan B ;) Almost five years after leaving my ‘proper job’ as a forensic scientist to become a freelance photographer, I can hardly remember what it was like to work regular hours or to use a mass-spectrometer. The industry is in flux right now and I would like to think that in 5 years time there will still be people hiring photographers to create for them.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AO: Yes, most of my friends are involved in the ‘creative industries’ as everything from curators and art-lovers, through to costume-makers and producers. I’m constantly exposed to new ideas and seeing new things, it is really inspiring to be around people who are ‘doing’ rather than just ‘day dreaming’. Most of my personal work would not have been possible if I was not part of a community of people who are hungry to experiment and explore new ideas. I am also aware that I am very lucky to be where I am and doing what I do.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

JOONEY WOODWARD: A graphic designer. I think this still influences my photography.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

JW: I really love the work of Geoff Charles, who was a Welsh photojournalist. My favourite advert at the moment is for Barclays Football.

JC: What are you up to right now?

JW: I’m planning a road trip across the States. I find the open road an inspiration.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

JW: Perhaps not mentors as such, but my friends have always pointed me in the right direction.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

JW: I live in London, but I do spend a lot of time in Wales and Dorset. I get my inspiration from the countryside.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

JW: If you don’t ask, the answer will always be no.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

JW: To buy an ice cream van and travel around the coast of Wales.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

JW: Very much so, but I think it’s also good to have a balance.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MEKAEL DAWSON: When I was about seven or eight, I was really into baseball, collecting cards and everything. So the idea of being a professional baseball player really enticed me. But by ten or eleven I picked up a skateboard and that was pretty much the end of that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MD: The idea of traveling to different environments has been an inspiring force as of late. Something about surrounding yourself with the new and unfamiliar, for me, really offers a fresh eye and new perspectives. I also find I am almost always inspired by whatever music really resonates with me at the present moment as well as good philosophical and mind expanding reads.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MD: Hustling, scheming, building, and staying creative along the way.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MD: In regards to photography, not really. My older sister gave me a bit of a crash course to the technicalities after I had already gotten into it, but the majority of my practices and knowledge has been self taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MD: Right now I am based in my native city of Los Angeles, California. L.A. can be rather arduous at times, but I find it perpetually offers inspiration, motivation and opportunities to grow. Part of me does feel the urge to venture out to different landscapes though.. See question #2

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MD: Well, as I haven’t formally studied photography, it feels strange offering advice to graduates, but I would just say know what you like to shoot and not to hold back. I say ‘know what you like to shoot’ implying intention, as it seems so many people sometimes shoot aimlessly, just trying to make a pretty picture. That’s fine when learning the technical aspects and experimenting, but I feel like when you start having some intention or expression in your work, something you’re trying to say or even sticking to a specific theme, you really start defining your own style and then can expand more and more. Focus breeds refinement. Learn to shoot manually and use your light meter rather than always shooting on auto so you’re not crippled when your light meter breaks. Also, shoot film as much as you can.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MD: I’ve never really been one for Plan B’s, as that sort of means you’re already entertaining the idea of failure, but if things don’t work out for me “professionally” in photography, I’m sure I’ll still be shooting but also creating different forms of art, as I sort of wear many creative hats. Or maybe I’ll just take off to the Amazon to study shamanism.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MD: I feel being a part of a creative community is incredibly important for one’s creative growth. Being around like minds, but more importantly differing perspectives, especially from creative individuals, really expands the boundaries of your own creativity. You may be very creative on your own, but as soon as you add different minds to the mix, you can really start expanding on what you can do and how you see things by challenging your own ideas and perspectives.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

QUINN MILTON: When I was very little, an actress. My brother was going to get me an agent and everything at the age of 10. As I grew older, I became more interested in writing, which is still something I hope to incorporate into future photography projects. But at 26, I’m still trying to figure everything out.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

QM: Maybe not so much inspiring me as challenging me, is this city. We have been in a perpetual winter for months now. As someone who loves to photograph light, the constant gloominess has been a challenge, but has also inspired me to look at this city differently and find ways to photograph it in ways I haven’t before.

JC: What are you up to right now?

QM: I am trying to venture into the print world. I think it’s tremendously important to see your work in a tangible way, to hold it in your hand instead of seeing it solely on a computer screen. Working to get myself organized and financially stable enough to complete a book encompassing my work from Africa.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

QM: It’s only been in the past few years that I’ve really pushed myself to share my photography with others. My boyfriend, Russ Augustine, has been instrumental in encouraging me to put myself out there and keep working at it, which I am grateful for. It makes a huge difference to have one person in your corner telling you you’re not crazy to be spending all your money on film.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

QM: I am based out of Chicago, IL, USA. This city is constantly changing, so it forces me to always keep my eyes open. A piece of graffiti today might be whitewashed tomorrow. A blizzard tonight could yield to a heat wave next week. I’ve seen the President give his acceptance speech in Grant Park, and paraded down the center of Michigan Avenue for two Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championships. It’s an exciting place to be.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

QM: Learning the technical aspects of photography is hugely important. Now use that knowledge without deadlines or critiques. There is a freedom after finishing school that allows you the time to really create what you’re passionate about, not just what’s required to graduate.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

QM: Sometimes I think I’m still looking for my plan A, everyone goes through life a bit blind. But I don’t think photography would ever be completely eliminated from the equation.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

QM: Photography was just my minor in college, so I was always a bit on the fringes of the photo community – which is vast here in Chicago. I think my personality leans a bit more toward the independent side, so I prefer to be more on my own, but I think that sort of tight, supportive community can benefit a lot of people greatly.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CLÉMENTINE SCHNEIDERMANN: I had the dream of doing a useful job. So I thought that I should be a doctor, until I realize that I wasn’t good enough in science and even if I was working days and nights, it would never work out. My brain was just not conceived for that! Photography came naturally, as I was taking more and more pictures. It took me a while to understand that I could be useful even by taking pictures.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CS: I find my inspiration almost everywhere except where I am from. I left my hometown (Clamart, 3km South Paris) six years ago, when I was 16. Since then, I’ve been living in different places (Switzerland, England and Wales) trying to find a town where I would feel inspired and happy. I feel comfortable in unfamiliar places with odd things that would never occur in my country. When I am home, I stop looking at things. I hope that one day I will come back and I will look at Parisian street as I look at the rest of the world.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CS: I just came back to Wales (where I am undertaking my master degree in documentary photography at the university of Newport) after a month trip in the US. Most of the time I was in Memphis but I also traveled across Chicago, Nashville and New Orleans.

As I am one of the three finalists of the Ideastap/Magnum award, I received funding to develop a new project, where I explored the myth around Elvis Presley in his home town. I was very grateful to receive the help from the Memphis based photographer Whitten Sabbatini who introduced me to his town.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CS: As I have been studying photography at two different schools (Applied art school of Vevey, Switzerland and the University of South Wales, Newport) I received some help from my different tutors who were helping me to develop a reflection about my work.

I also like to show my pictures to my father, not only because he (almost) likes them all, but also because he doesn’t know much about the photographic world so he won’t compare my work to others - he will always judge it more objectively. Sometimes he asks me genuine questions that are for me very relevant. For example he asked me once why all my subjects were looking sad in my pictures. I never thought about that because we are used in contempory photography to see sad people with no expressions. It made me realize that it’s not because a picture looks tragic or sad that it is stronger.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CS: I was living in Bristol last year but I moved to Newport, South Wales in September 2013. Wales is not renowned for its sunshine so I guess the climate is the main influence on my working method. It forced me to give up on my romantic attraction for the soft light and to explore other possibilities such as the strong and dirty flash! Newport is often portrayed as a sad little town, which I can understand, but my goal is to show something else than this usual sadness.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CS: I would say that its most important to follow your intuitions and to do a project for yourself and not for the school or to get famous. Also, I see so many people around me struggling with their project, and they seem to forget to enjoy what they are doing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CS: To open a bakery with some nice pictures on the walls.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CS: Yes because of course it’s great to share ideas and get some feedback when we want to show our new fresh work but no because I feel like the more we talk about photography and our work, the less spontaneous we become.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

OLIVER EGLIN: A naturalist; I was obsessed by nature and anything David Attenborough would lend his voice to I would watch. As a child I spent countless hours sifting through rock pools and ponds as I embarked upon a relentless study of British wildlife. Later, when I had reached my teens, I began to avidly read film scripts and obsess over seedy thrillers like Chinatown and Taxi Driver, with the definite goal of directing a film of my own one day. Actually it’s still an important ambition of mine.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

OE: In the last year I’ve had the opportunity to work as an assistant for Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin. Their insatiable drive to produce new and challenging imagery is really inspirational and I continue to be fascinated by the work they produce. Photographically speaking my influences range from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Wolfgang Tillmans to August Sander. However I look for inspiration from every art form, lately I’ve been reading a lot of mid/late-20th Century prose such as: William Faulkner, J.M. Coetzee, Cormac McCarthy and Raymond Carver.

JC: What are you up to right now?

OE: Right now I’m developing two projects that I have been shooting in Sicily. Il Gattopardo is a diaristic and very instinctive piece that I built up as I travelled around the island. The other is a lot more considered and perhaps a new direction for me in terms its narrative format. I also have another project I’m working on in Wales which mixes cinematic elements with straight photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

OE: I’m lucky to have parents who are both actively involved in the arts and it would be impossible to credit anyone without first mentioning their influence on me. Through my father Philip Eglin I have been introduced to painting and sculpture and from my mother cinema and literature. Whenever I have new work or ideas I always look to them for critique and advice, as ultimately I respect their opinion over any other. As well as this I’ve been fortunate enough to have had some great tutors whilst studying for my degree, without whom I wouldn’t be where I am today.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

OE: After 3 years in Berlin I returned to London a year ago and haven’t looked back. It’s a first time for me living in the east of the city and I really enjoy the location. My room overlooks the canal and waking up in the morning to watch cormorants diving for fish or a heron stalking along the banks is something I will never tire of.

One of my most inspiring moments last year was when I attended a screening of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth at the ICA. Glazer had come personally to present the film in memory of cinematographer Harris Savides, who had recently passed away. It was a very moving speech to an intimate crowd and the film really left a lasting impression on me.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

OE: Be patient and don’t expect things to fall into place instantly, to be successful in the art world requires a lot of perseverance. Paul Graham wrote a fantastic piece for the Yale MFA graduation book which should be compulsory reading for every photography student in the country, it’s all the motivation you’ll ever need.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

OE: Anything that means I can be by the ocean; I love surfing and get away to Wales or Portugal whenever I can. There’s something incredibly humbling and serene about sitting out on the waves at the mercy of the gods.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

OE: I think so. Although I’m not the vociferous networking-type, I do however enjoy the opportunity to discuss art amongst likeminded individuals. I try to visit as many shows and exhibitions as I have time for and being in London is great because there’s an inexhaustible variety of things to see and do.

@mullitovercc