• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

GASTON ZVI ICKOWICZ: A soccer player

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

GZI: Leo Messi inspires me everyday. The work of French author Michel Houellebecq is a great inspiration for me.

JC: What are you up to right now?

GZI: I’m currently working towards a solo show that will open in Tel Aviv in September 2014. For the first time in my career, the show will integrate photography with video works. I am very excited about this transition and think it would open a new direction in my practice.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

GZI: During my studies I have met and worked closely with many tutors that have influenced me in various ways. I am less of a mentor-type of guy, and more open to a variety of influences.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

GZI: I live and work in Tel Aviv, Israel. My entire artistic practice is based on the Israeli space and territory. As the spatial reality here is consistently changing, so does its impact on my work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

GZI: Do not neglect the photographic tradition.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

GZI: Pursue my childhood dream and become a soccer player!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

GZI: Yes, but not solely.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

CURRAN HATLEBERG: Somewhere someone said that what you become always falls in line with your first memory. My first one is this: my father and I are gathering smooth river rocks from a muddy river bank. It’s very humid, cicadas are screaming. We take the stones home and wash away the rich clay with the garden hose. After they dry we spend the afternoon in the backyard arranging them on a table and painting them with primary colors. One of those rocks sits on my desk as I write this. 

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

CH: Recently I think a lot about Cynthia Daignault’s paintings and Ben Jasnow’s poetry.

JC: What are you up to right now?

CH: Currently I am editing a book of new work slated for the fall and teaching photography part time.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

CH: Yes, of course. They are friends, family, lovers, teachers, strangers—all of them are knitted together—but perhaps strangers offer different kinds of learning events than the rest, and possibly leave the strangest residue. They help us question our assumptions about what’s possible and what’s meaningful. They force abrupt plunges into completely surprising experiences. So it’s twofold, really, It’s my father painting rocks with me in the backyard but it’s also the blind man who showed me the pistol he kept in a shoebox under his sink. Hunched over he squinted up at me and said, “You know, people do wrong things to know they’re living.” I didn’t know what to say. Then he put it back in it’s place and told me he had to go to bed and showed me the door. I could never have expected this exchange, and it’s meaning isn’t clear, but in a way it’s a moment you stay inside after its over. 

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

CH: I just left a home in Eureka, CA and currently live in upstate NY. I used to live in NYC before that but found I couldn’t be productive there—It sucks time and energy if you’re easily distracted, it’s crazy expensive and I always manage to confuse what’s most important there. My girlfriend says NYC is like a giant glue trap that you have to chew your own arm off of get out. I’d say she’s right. 

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

CH: Work like there’s no plan B.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

CH: Go down with the ship.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

CH: I think it’s vital. My friends deliver the balancing act of both criticism and support. In turn this fosters hard work and meaningful dialogue. It’s what ultimately propels artistic practice into new areas of growth and success.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DANNY LANE: I’ve always wanted to be an actor for as long as I can remember. It shaped my life through college and then it started to feel impossible. I’m still growing up and I still want to be an actor.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DL: I love 80s minimalism. Photos and especially music. My friends make fun of me. I’ll listen to a lot of classical music, modern-experimental, etc… but I always come back to minimal 80s dance music… and I usually play that when I am shooting.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DL: I just finished a black and white diary project for a magazine in Boston. I’ve been doing my usual test shoots for model agencies, recording music with my band and hanging out with my family a lot. I definitely have a nice amount of sessions lined up. I’m really excited to put together collections from those.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DL: If you mean with photography - no. I’ve taught myself everything.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DL: I’m based in New York and I actually think it’s kind of tough over here. When I write to people, it is never the ones from New York who write back. People seem more accepting in other cities and countries… but this could be because I’ve lived in New York my whole life and I’m jaded like everyone else.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DL: Immerse yourself. I find I do best at times when I REALLY dig in. Research aspects of photography and find out for yourself how the whole thing works. Who shoots for who? What does this function on my camera do? What’s the difference between commercial and editorial? Why would I choose Sony or Canon? When do I need a flash? Stuff like that..

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DL: Oh, I’ll be an elevator mechanic in no time. I know if I go to college again, I can became a psychiatrist… but man! Go to college again?!?!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DL: It depends on what you do. If you’re a musician, yea, you should befriend other bands and stuff. When I was doing theater, I did feel like it was important to be around the theatre… but with photography, it feels like every man for himself… at least in my experience. If you can find a community of cool people who are accepting of your work - go with that, for sure. Being a part of a community usually means more gigs and more feedback. That can never hurt.

  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc
  • I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage…

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc

I was really happy when Luca agreed to be interviewed for a second time on MULL IT OVER back in February. We have interviewed him once before in September 2009 and I have been eager to get him back ever since. Sage has a wonderful way with his subjects and more often than not will use natural light amazingly. Give a big hand to Luca Sage

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

LUCA SAGE: The only thing I wanted when I was growing up was to play for Arsenal, I didn’t think about anything else. I also remember wanting a plane, a really big plane. I went round the class and wrote down a list of who wanted to be the first passengers. My mate Kevin was going to build it, I would fly it. Anything is possible when you’re six. Funny to think of how even back then I had a desire to jump on a plane and see the World.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

LS: Nelson Mandela and Steve McQueen (the director not the actor). Both very inspiring to say the least. Photographically wise, Broomberg and Chanarin's early work is always an inspiration.

JC: What are you up to right now?

LS: Sitting in my freezing studio sending a file to Harpers Bazaar Australia. Apart from that I’m working on a series of newspapers which should be ready in a few weeks.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

LS: My father would love to be listed here so I’ll say my father. Apart from him I’d probably say Mark Power's influence and wise words have always stuck with me and been an inspiration.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

LS: Currently I’m based in Brighton, where you can’t walk the streets without bumping into another photographer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

LS: Less thinking, more shooting. Whatever advice somebody gives it’s often more directed at themselves than for others, so obviously I need to shoot more and think less but I think it’s pretty universal these days? And if all else fails, be a plumber, it won’t make you as happy but I’ve never met a poor plumber.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

LS: Be a contemporary dancer. Or build the plane that I wanted when I was six. Or phone Wenger, they are a bit short this season.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

LS: Yes I would say so, I used to work from home but it’s not ideal by any means, a shared studio space is much better for photographers these days. Collectives are also a great idea to get your work seen and also be encouraged when the going gets tough. Hang on, why am I not in a collective?

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. 
In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARSHALL SCHEIDER: I think at different points in my childhood I aspired to be a writer, an illustrator, a musician, and an archaeologist

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MS: I’ve just finished reading three books of writings on photography by Robert Adams- Beauty in Photography, Why People Photograph, and Along Some Rivers. They are all incredible books, and important in my opinion for anyone interested in pursuing “straight” photography as fine art to read. Adams’ work and thoughts are very inspiring to me at the moment.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MS: Shooting a lot; I have a couple of different ideas/themes I’m playing with and chasing down at the moment. I’ve been thinking a lot about book making, and building cohesive portfolios. I’m currently reading Camera Lucida and trying to break down Barthes’ thoughts on photography.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MS: My father was a prolific street photographer and a great artist. We had a darkroom in the house growing up, and though I didn’t pick up a camera until I was a teenager, I think my father’s eye and approach has had a major impact on the artist I am now.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MS: I moved to Brooklyn last August. It’s had a pretty significant effect on the work I am creating. I moved from Oregon, where I grew up, and was working in a somewhat meditative and methodical manner prior to leaving. I was shooting a lot of large format work and was exploring a spaciousness that exists in the West that I have not found on the East coast. As a photographer, your physical location and your work are inseparably tied. I’m working a lot more in 35mm here, and allowing my work to be messy. It’s the only way I’ve found to honestly photograph New York.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MS: I don’t really know. I myself am not a photography graduate. Think critically about the work you want to create, and create it. In Beauty in Photography, in an essay on criticism, Adams puts forth three simple questions posed by Henry James to be used for critiquing art: What is the artist trying to do? Does he do it? Was it worth doing? I have been trying to use this as a guide for myself in editing and building portfolios, and find it helpful, though not always easy. Why am I creating this work is an important question to ask.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MS: Continue to make photographs regardless.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MS: I think that it is for me, but that community does not necessarily have to be physical and tangible. I find a sense of community in reading photographer’s thoughts on photography, and seeing work that is inspiring to me- in person, online, in print- if you are involved in the medium, you are part of the community, part of the discussion.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

DUSTIN CANTRELL: I wanted to make films and still sort of do.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

DC: For awhile now Vivian Maier has been inspiring me. Her photos are beyond amazing and I’m fascinated by the whole story about her.

JC: What are you up to right now?

DC: I’m currently working on a portrait project about couchsurfers. I hosted quite a bit when I lived in San Francisco and surfed a little while backpacking in Europe. It’s really an amazing experience having a complete stranger come to your house and feel like their an old friend. The project keeps me connected with the community and gives me a thrill even if I dislike the portrait I end up taking. The long term goal of the project is to capture a couchsurfer in every state and to eventually put out a book. You can check out the project here.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

DC: When I was living in Australia I assisted for Gina Milicia. I learned lots of useful things from her. The most important thing I learned was realizing photography is my real passion and how to be comfortable with any subject no matter how famous they might be.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

DC: I’m currently living an hour and a half north of San Francisco and feel like I’m not doing as much because of my location. I’m planning on moving closer to the city next year to be able to shoot more personal work.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

DC: Get out and travel. I can’t imagine the person I would be if I never traveled. And, I highly recommend traveling alone because you learn so much about yourself.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

DC: I don’t have a plan B because I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

DC: I’m not really part of any creative community, which is probably not a good idea.

@mullitovercc