• JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook  Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MOLLY MATALON: When I was growing up I honestly never thought about what I wanted to “be”. I liked animals, taking pictures and punk music…I liked traveling and thought I would be a flight attendant. Then I just ended up at art school.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MM: I am most inspired by my friends making work all the time. Corey Olsen, Zak Krevitt, Damien Maloney, Caroline Tompkins, Mike and Claire, Rob Kulisek, Ryan Lowry, Lauren Cook Vivian Fu, Tim O’Connell, Tim Schutsky, Thomas McCarty, and Frankie Carino. I’m also inspired by old yearbook pictures, pictures of people in water, sunsets in California, and this group of 16 year olds I teach every summer in the black and white darkroom.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MM: Right now… I am writing some emails to editors, cooking vegan buffalo wings and stamping dust off of scanned negatives.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MM: I am lucky enough to have just graduated from an amazing photography program at the School of Visual Arts. Joe Maida, Lyle Rexer, Willian Nabers, and Ellen Wallenstein are some teachers I had that I consider a mentor.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MM: I live in Brooklyn, NY. I have lived here for the past 4 years. It has shaped me to be an even harder worker than I am and keeps me on my toes. It has also fully exhausted me at the same time.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MM: You get out of life as much as you put into it. You have to work hard. No one is going to come knocking on your door saying “oh i heard you take pictures…” Organize your negatives. Once I had a teacher tell me…”if you don’t like pictures taken during overcast, wait a day and go out when it’s sunny… but always go out and make pictures”

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MM: There is no plan B.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MM: I would not be who I am without my creative community. It’s vital to be around people who are all working towards similar goals but on different paths. I love photography and so do all my friends, there is nothing better than that.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are  helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are  helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are  helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are  helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are  helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW DIPROSE: I’ve always had a strong connection to nature and being outdoors so I wanted to do something environmental. A wildlife photographer or film maker. Now that I’m working as a photographer I shoot landscapes when I can but have a stronger connection with people and shooting portraits.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AD: I’m really inspired by films and documentaries at the moment. They are helping me develop my work in the stills world. I’ve been watching a lot of Richard Linklater’s films and Jo Scwab, Neil Krug and Boogie would have to be some of my biggest inspirations in photography right now. Helmut Newton would be an all time favourite!

JC: What are you up to right now?

AD: I am a co creator, photographer and designer at Paper Sea Quarterly Magazine. It’s a boutique surf, travel and art magazine based in Melbourne Australia. I work part time at a tv production company and I freelance and shoot as much personal stuff as I can. Between all of that I love hanging out on the couch and relaxing.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AD: Yes, I’ve been very fortunate to have some great mentors. I think its something that you will always need throughout your career. When I was living in New York I worked for Mark Seliger, which really started my interest and drive to shoot commercially. Now that I’m back in Australia I admire and have great respect for most off the photographers I have either assisted or worked with.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AD: I’m currently in Melbourne, Australia. This is the place that has really shaped and advanced my work. The pace here is very easy going and I am very comfortable right now. That won’t last forever as I am always looking for that new source of inspiration. I lived in New York for about 5 years though and that was the place that really launched my interest and initiative in photography.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AD: Never lose the passion. Never judge your creative achievements or skills off someone else’s work. Live and work on your own terms and timeline and know its a lifetime commitment.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AD: I’d enjoy running a bar, gallery or creative space where cool people can come and hang out and have a good time.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AD: It’s about finding the right balance between solitude and socialising. I love my alone time, but hanging out with the right people helps you develop yourself as an artist.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

SALLY WANLESS: I actually wanted to be a primary school teacher for a long time, though I was always studying art in some way, that was always there. It seems that just always creeped in, in some form, which I am so glad for now.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

SW: So much! It’s such a creative world now, it seems to be endless which is amazing. I get a lot of inspiration from Chase Jarvis’ online streaming show CJLIVE as well as his company CreativeLIVE which puts out content all the time and as an online education, I think that’s changing the way people want to learn. Books also come into it, quite heavily these days, one of my favourites recently is, Austin Kleon’s Show Your Work.

JC: What are you up to right now?

SW: I’ve started preparing for a Solo Exhibition next year, which I am really excited about. I have a personal project in pre production called Humanity which is a documentary plus portraits, which I start shooting hopefully this October/November. Other than that, it’s shooting work for clients, meeting with clients and generally keep going and shooting new work.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

SW: No mentors as such, But I generally see the people I get inspiration from, have been far away mentors. Whether they are in the photography industry or not, nowadays people are giving out such a generous amounts of knowledge and advice, and that I have to say, I really have appreciated and taken on board.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

SW: I am based in the Scottish Borders, about an hour from Edinburgh. I think it’s always that thing where you think the grass is always greener else where, but I do think it has served me incredibly well. Theres a huge creative circle and people are very encouraging round here. The landscape has also added to my photography, I think if i’d been in the city, I don’t think I would have got myself so engrossed with it. Being here I feel also that because you’re not always in the city, I definitely feel when I am in other places, things definitely seem to feel richer.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

SW: Shoot work everyday, doesn’t matter how big a project or how small, just keep putting work out there. Networking I think is majorly important, and don’t compare yourself to other peoples work, just do your own thing.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

SW: There is no plan B. I read somewhere that someone had said, if you make a plan B, then you’re half expecting plan A to fail. I also think if you just have plan A, then theres absolutely nothing to lose, in terms of creativity and it’s amazing how motivated you can get when you have a lack of options. When there’s a will, theres a way I guess!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

SW: Oh absolutely! It’s paramount I think! Not only bouncing ideas off others, but seeing what else is out there, to see their ideas and work, it’s not just needful but it’s so refreshing.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MIKE TSENTI: When I was much younger I wanted to be a lego brick maker. I want to make the bricks that came together to build whatever my imagination wanted to make. I think this was an early start to my creativity. As I got older I started to head towards wanting to write for magazines. I then started shooting when i was about 14/15 and that made me want to start focusing on photography and try to mix it in with writing.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MT: At the moment I am very influenced by film effects. This is something I always like to use with my photography but I have not had the time recently to get film developed so I have been working with giving my images a vintage clean feel using simple Photoshop techniques. I am always inspired by articles I see from Time Magazine and it really inspires me to want to travel and photograph my experiences.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MT: Right now I am currently working on a project focusing on the blending of nature and the human identity. It’s a subject I’ve been into the idea of human identity and taking it away ever since I left college so really I’m experimenting with new ideas on that.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MT: I have not really had much help with what I want to do with my photography. I had some University teachers assist me but they never really helped me define how I wanted to approach my photography and I felt a little let down by them when I was trying to explain ideas that were shrugged off for not being commercial enough. I would say my dad has been my biggest mentor as he was the first person to introduce me to photography and is still giving me tips to this date.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MT: I am currently based in North London and although it is not a great area for creativity Central London is only about 30 minutes away by tube so it’s not an issue. As I am currently just working on my own ideas it’s a relaxing environment to help me think about ideas and plan. I plan to try and move to the US or Canada in the next few years to try to improve my career prospects.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MT: It sounds silly but don’t be extremely optimistic when you graduate. It’s an extremely tough business and you will have to work hard when you finish. I was very optimistic when I finished and it disheartened me a lot when reality hit. But do some free work, internships or photography jobs, and the experience will take you places!

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MT: My plan A is to get working for a magazine or creative company as a picture editor. My plan B is to simply work and get enough money to fund myself and as I said previously, travel around the world and photograph my experiences and try to really capture what is going on in the world, not holiday snaps.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MT: It is very important to be a part of a creative community. Here in Barnet (where I live) it is very hard to find creativity as most of my friends are not from creative backgrounds but I have stayed in contact with some friends from University so it’s nice to talk to them about creativity. It keeps the juices flowing and ensures I do not get lazy and sit around all day.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

RACHEL JONAS: Free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

RJ: Iceland. The most beautiful country in the world. Erin Spens the editor at my favourite magazine. She inspires me as a creative, a friend, a mother, and so much more. Abner and Amanda Rameriz, amazing musicians who are also astounding people. Elli Thor, a great surf/adventure photographer. The great community of artists that I know in this little Southern town in Virginia. Some of which are Kyle Murphy, from Falling Acorn Timber Framing; David Sickmen from The Hackensaw Boys.

JC: What are you up to right now?

RJ: I am preparing to go to Siberia in the Spring to photograph the Evenki, nomadic reindeer herders.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

RJ: I have been inspired by the creative work and discipline of many people. But I have not had a photography mentor. I’m self-taught.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

RJ: I moved from NYC several years ago and landed in a small town in Virginia. I have had so much more time to pursue photography and live in a creative, supportive enviournment.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

RJ: Practice and all is coming.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

RJ: Bunny herding? No, I don’t have any plan other than to say yes to the things that ignite my heart.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

RJ: It is completely essential. I am inspired everyday by the people around me. Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.

@mullitovercc

  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I  decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I  decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I  decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I  decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc
  • JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I  decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

MARISA CHAFETZ: I wanted to be a veterinarian until I was 10. Then, my mom bought me a camera and I decided I wanted to be a photographer. For a while, around age 13, my career goal was to be the editor-in-chief of vogue or something like that.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

MC: Lately I’ve been inspired by relationships. People and places, people and other people, people and their homes, people and their wardrobe, etc. Basically how what we interact with changes us and shapes us. Some photographers that are inspiring me right now are Vivian Fu, Charlie Brophey, Ryan Mcginley, and Chad Moore.

JC: What are you up to right now?

MC: I’m leaving New York and going back to New Orleans this week! I go school there from August to May. I’m going to really be focusing on my personal work. I’m planning on starting a zine. New Orleans is the place where I am really inspired.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

MC: Yes! I currently intern for Olivia Bee. She inspires me so much, her work is unbelievable. Watching her work has helped me so much as an artist. I literally can not thank her enough.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

MC: I’m currently in New York but like I said before I’m leaving this week! However, New York has shaped my work so so very much. I think living in New York is all about suffering. I grew up here so I’m not all starry eyed about the city. New York is a hard place to live- you come to New York to follow your dream and tough it out. Its competitive, expensive, the weather usually sucks, and its just really god damn exhausting. But it has made me so much better as an artist. Because everyone is creative, you have to push yourself to stay afloat! Everyone here is pushing themselves and everyone here is passionate. It’s actually really inspiring. I can’t imagine a better place to develop as an artist.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

MC: The only advice I feel comfortable giving is to just take as many pictures as you can, always. Don’t be afraid of taking a bad picture. That was my problem for a while.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

MC: There is only a plan A! I feel as though I could always find a place for myself somewhere within the art/fashion community. I’m so in love with what I do there is no way I could give up on pursing it.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

MC: Yes. I love having creative people around me to push me. When I’m surrounded by creative people I feel very safe, very at home. What I really need is just to be around people who are passionate about what they love no matter what that ‘something’ is.

@mullitovercc